Gargoyles – Season 1, Episode 9 – “Enter Macbeth” – A New Threat, Great Villain and New Beginning

macbeth

 

“Enter Macbeth” is a great episode for a lot of reasons. Most of which I’ll get into in the assessment. One thing that does make it amazing though, is how it took a Shakespeare character and did something amazing with him, making him a character that fits and contributes to the lore of this Universe.

The episode was written by Steve Perry and directed by Kazuo Terada and Saburo Hashimoto. It is the 8th episode of the 1st season.

The story involves Macbeth approaching Xanatos and prison and letting him and Owen know that he knows about the gargoyle threat and that he can defeat them as he’s defeated them before. While this is going on a recovering Detective Maza is trying to convince Goliath they have to leave which he is resisting as the Castle is the home he’s known all his life and out of all of them, he’s the most resistant to change. Things come to a head though when Lexington, Brooklyn and Bronx are captured by Macbeth and Goliath must rescue them. The story unfolds from there.

Here is the assessment of the episode:

The Pros: Goliath – Goliath is tradition and the base for the gargoyles, it is why he’s the leader, as he isn’t the oldest…Hudson is. We see that he leaves no one behind though as he fights and defeats Macbeth in his own home and mocks Macbeth when he learns Macbeth captured them so he could get revenge on Demona. On the reveal that Demona doesn’t care about them, he loses it. In the fight Macbeth’s home is burned to the ground but he Goliath is forced to admit when Broadway and Maza convince him that the Castle is no longer their’s as Xanatos is free from prison and Macbeth is still out there. He does promise Owen that they’ll be back though.

Lexington – We see his brains at work again as he is able to sap the power from the cages to have Bronx break out of his cage and get Goliath to save them.

Brooklyn – Is comedic relief and good in this episode as he keeps annoying Lexington by electrocuting his finger on the cage until Lexington can come up with a plan.

Broadway – Sees the big picture and plays a part in convincing Goliath they need to leave the Castle, which makes sense since he is the gargoyle most of the current time period.

Detective Maza – Sees the big picture, fights Macbeth briefly when injured and is largely the reason Goliath gives in to them finding a new home. She also finds them a new home in the Clocktower.

Macbeth – Voiced by John Rhys-Davies of “Lord of the Rings” and “Indiana Jones” fame he owns this role. He is a compelling antagonist who is immortal though we don’t know why…and extremely intelligent as he uses technology and his strength to defeat the gargoyles. He also manages to escape from Goliath’s wrath.

The Ending – Things have changed…Xanatos is free, the gargoyles have changed homes, Detective Maza is still injured and recovering from being shot, and Macbeth is on the scene and a new player in the game against the gargoyles.

Okay – What we Know about Macbeth – We know he knows Demona and gave her her name, but we don’t know why he hates the gargoyles or how he is still alive after all these years. It’s not a bad thing, but a little more about him would have served the story better.

I recommend this episode for sure, and it is a favorite, even though it isn’t perfect. Macbeth is a great antagonist, and with Xanatos free and the gargoyles changing homes…we see that actions from prior episodes have consequences. It’s nice seeing that the gargoyles came from Ancient Scotland put to good use and have Macbeth be from that time period and their world.

Final Score for this episode: 9.5 / 10. Definitely a favorite.

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