12 Days of Doctors – The 6th Doctor – Season 21, Episode 7 – “The Twin Dilemma” – Everyone is Terrible or Boring

The Twin Dilemma

I really wanted to like this episode…I mean really wanted to. I like Doctor Who and I like Classic Doctor Who. I can safely say there is nothing much of value to like in the “Twin Dilemma.” There is so much badness here that I’m honestly surprised I got through the episode. Before I go into too much detail in the assessment, I’ll give the two main reasons why. All the characters in this episode are either terrible people or terribly boring.

“The Twin Dilemma,” is Colin Baker’s first adventure as the Doctor. It takes place in the 21st Season and is the 7th Episode of that season. His companion for the episode is Peri. The episode was directed by Peter Moffatt and written by Anthony Steven. All these people are part of the reason why it sucked so much.

For example, the story begins the 5th regenerating into the 6th Doctor and him and Peri fighting. He strangles her (yep, the Doctor is a violent sociopath this time, so there is that) and after says he’ll atone by making them monks on Titan III, where two super twins have been kidnapped by his former friend Azmael who is going under the name of Edgeworth. They are left on the asteroid and one of the servants of the big bad Mestor, sets the asteroid facility to explode. From here the story unfolds as the twins are being used by Mestor a half slug and humanoid creature in order for it to conquer the universe.

Twin Dilemma
6th Doctor and Peri

Here is the assessment of the episode:

The Pros: Slight improvement in narrative structure- The episode gets a little better after the first part, that is the most I can say in favor of this episode. You begin to think the Doctor being a dick has stopped until the final part where nothing he went through actually changed him and he is still a threatening ass. Still, he doesn’t strangle Peri again.

Cons: The 6th Doctor / The Sixth Doctor – What were Colin Baker, Peter Moffatt and Anthony Steven thinking? Who thought it would be a good idea for the Doctor to go paranoid and strangle and try to kill his companion? It makes absolutely no sense and he never owns up to it. He brushes off the fact that he nearly killed someone…his excuses range from the regeneration being rough, to being an alien to it was his inner feelings the entire time as the past Doctors. Screw you, 6th Doctor. No one cares about abusive pricks. Oh, he saves the day and saves a soldier named Hugo who Mestor attempts to destroy, but it mostly seems to function as a way to drive the plot. There is no reason why he seems to care in certain instances, or why he cares about Peri since he is arguing with her and putting her down as much as she is him.

Peri – Peri is the only companion in this, which is a shame. She calls the Doctor out for his actions at one point, but the rest of the time is whining about being with him…why doesn’t she just ask to go home? She clearly doesn’t want to be there, and the script gives us no reason why she would care about this Doctor, since he doesn’t care about her or anyone. Most of her actions show she doesn’t care about him too as she whines about being with him and well, everything.

The Support Characters – We got two Wesley Crushers or Wonder Boys in Romulus and Remus the two twins being used by Mestor to turn the planet he conquered Jaconda suitable for his young…they are terrible characters and terribly acted, you have the Jacondans who have cool bird people design but do absolutely nothing of consequence and you have Azmael who the script doesn’t know how to handle at all, as he is an enemy or friend on a whim and only able to get away with so  much because Mestor is such a one dimensional idiotic villain.

Mestor – The giant slug villain who destroys things with his mind is one of the more stupid villains on Doctor Who. He was supposed to be a legendary beast, but his design is just awful and he talks way too much. Everytime he is established as a threat the Doctor or Mestor himself shows us that he is a joke (but the writer and director clearly wanted him to be a threat). So much bad writing here. One of the worst Doctor Who villains created on the show.

Because of how Six was written and handled contributed in a major way to Doctor Who being cancelled during the Seventh Doctor’s run…and after seeing this episode that cancellation came about for a reason. If the Doctor is abusive to those around him and his companion and gives us no redeemable qualities…why the hell should we care about the character? There was no one worth caring about in this entire episode, and our heroes were some of the worst characters on television, especially the 6th Doctor. They weren’t heroes at all, especially Colin Baker’s Doctor. I don’t recommend this episode at all, except as a learning tool. I hope Steven Moffat doesn’t turn the 12th Doctor into this kind of Doctor. We don’t need another character who doesn’t care so gives us no reason to care about him and his story.

Final Score for this episode is 1 / 10. Everyone in this episode and responsible for this episode was terrible.

The 6th Doctor

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12 Days of Doctors – The 5th Doctor – Season 19, Episode 1 – “Castrovalva” – The Manipulations of the Master

Master and 5th Doctor

We continue the 12 Days of Doctors, in our lead up to 12th’s first adventure “Deep Breath,” with the introduction of the 5th Doctor played by Peter Davison and his first adventure “Castrovalva.”

“Castrovalva” was directed by Fiona Cumming and written by Christopher Bidmead. It also had the Master as the primary antagonist, who in this incarnation is played by Anthony Ainley. This episode also is when the Doctor had the most companions during a season since Adric, Nyssa and Tegan would become series regulars with the 5th Doctor after this episode.

“Castrovalva,” picks up where the last one left off with the 4th Doctor’s death and soon regeneration. Nyssa, Adric and Tegan find themselves captured but manage to escape and begin working on helping the Doctor find stability since the regeneration he went through was difficult for him. This leads them to Castrovalva after Adric is captured and the Master attempts to destroy them by having Adric program the TARDIS to run into the beginning of the Big Bang in order to destroy it. From here the story unfolds.

How does the episode hold up? How does the Master do? How is Peter Davison’s first time as the Doctor? All of that in the assessment.

Castrovalva

Here is the assessment of the episode:

Pros: The Fifth Doctor / The 5th Doctor – Peter Davison is great as the Doctor. He is by far the most empathetic out of all the ones up to this point, and arguably the most human. In Davison we get a Doctor who openly cares about his companions, to the point that even when he knows one is missing he is thrown into a funk. This is the Doctor who wins by winning hearts…since it is by turning the Master’s own creations in “Castrovalva” against him that they are victorious and can save Adric. He doesn’t have much of a relationship with the Master though…he is just the hero to the Master’s villain. That is really the only issue I can think of and that has more to do with writing than anything else.

The Master – The Master is fantastic in this. He captures Adric (not that hard) but uses the power of the Wonder Boy (Adric is super smart and can fly the TARDIS…these characters are usually not done well (see Wesley Crusher) and Adric is no exception)…and nearly destroys the Doctor twice. He also manages to survive proving himself once again as one of the Doctor’s greatest and smartest of enemies.

Castrovalva – Is a medieval city crafted by “The Web” in order to trap the Doctor. The Master plays the elder who makes friends with the Doctor and companions and at first you think his assistant is the bad guy until his reveal. In the end his assistant gives his life to stop the Master and save the Doctor and his companions. I loved my time in this city and it’s a shame it won’t be around anymore as an answer to just because someone is evil doesn’t mean they can’t create good.

Okay/Good: The Companions – Nyssa and Tegan are fantastic. You have the everyday person in Tegan who is a flight attendant, and the scientist in Nyssa. Both help the Doctor a lot and actually are active in the story. Adric is only active because of his super brain…which is never explained and is the Robin of the episode needing saving by Batman at the end. God he’s annoying. I wish he’d left during the 4th Doctor’s run. Nyssa and Tegan are awesome companions though.

So how does the episode hold up? Pretty well. It is a little slow in places and Adric is a minus point in most instances (this episode is no exception). But this is an episode I’d recommend and I’d call it a favorite if only for Nyssa, Tegan, The 5th Doctor and the Master (and Castrovalva again is a great place).

Final Score is 8.5 / 10

5th Doctor

12 Days of Doctors – The 4th Doctor – Season 12, Episode 1 – “The Robot” – An Attempt to Explore the Formation of Morality Through a Robot

Robot_(Doctor_Who)

We continue the 12 Days of Doctors, the count up to 12th’s first adventure with “Robot.” “Robot,” is the first adventure of and our introduction to the 4th Doctor, Tom Baker. The writer for this story was Terrance Dicks and director was Christopher Barry. How did Tom Baker do taking Jon Pertwee’s place in his first adventure? We’ll explore that in the assessment.

The story begins with the Doctor  regenerating into his Fourth Incarnation in front of The Brig and Sarah Jane Smith. They immediately get him to the doctors and Brig puts Harry Sullivan on the Doctor to watch him. Before this we see a robot infiltrate a military base and steal something. We find out from The Brigadier that Nuclear Plans for all the major powers were stolen. From here a plan is devised with Harry going undercover in “The Think Tank,” as Sarah does the same as a reporter. From here they learn of the “Think Tank’s” plan to use the Robot to destroy the Earth so that they may survive and create the race of those worthy of leading…what they didn’t count on besides the Doctor and his companions were the Robot and the Robot’s inventor Kettlewell. From here the story unfolds between the different factions and the Robot’s inner turmoil.

Robot 4

Here is the assessment of the episode:

The Pros: The Fourth Doctor / The 4th Doctor – Tom Baker is fantastic as the Doctor. He adapts to every situation, plays the fool, but also has a lot of fun along the way. He also has a pretty big ego since he only stays because Sarah and the Brig say they need him. He has great chemistry with all of them, and definitely some hangups over being trapped with UNIT for so long. This is contrasted with Sarah who is trusting and is a rule breaker like him versus Harry and the Brig who are military men of UNIT who are well intentioned but more traditional in their approaches. One of the best lines at the end is the Doctor’s recognition of the Robot’s humanity and all life’s capacity for good and evil and offering Sarah Jane Smith a jelly baby before their next adventure with Harry. He of course has one of the best get-ups too with his distinctive multi-colored scarf, long coat and hat.

The Companions – Harry and Sarah are both active in this story, in Harry’s case trying to figure out what “The Think Tank” wants, and in Sarah’s case, trying to convince the Robot not to destroy and that humanity is worth being saved. They both do their roles well and both need to be rescued by the Doctor and UNIT, establishing the threat of antagonists in the process. Also, Sarah Jane Smith is one of my all time favorite companions.

The Brigadier – The Brig is once again fantastic, though his cons are much more apparent as his distrust of people who are different than him (which the Doctor brilliantly mocks…I’m guessing he does learn based off past episodes) and manages to use UNIT to hold off the Robot.

k1 the Robot – K1 is the robot created by Kettlewell and is for all intents and purposes the child learning how to be good. It has built into it’s program to protect humanity and not to kill humans, but “The Think Tank” keeps having it go against it. This could have been handled much better, but that has more to do with “The Think Tank,” than the Robot, who actually has a pretty cool design and an interesting character arc where the hypocrisy and lying eventually makes it go mad. I wish we could have got more time of it exploring itself since I don’t remember it having any deep conversations with the Doctor, all those conversations happened with Sarah Jane Smith.

Cons: “The Think Tank” – This organization was so contrived, did they want to make them scientists, businessmen or Nazis? Did they want money or just to destroy the world? Why did they think the way they did about their own superiority? Gah, I hated these guys. Every time they were in they were an evil organization cliche and it wasn’t hammed up enough to be interesting. I didn’t care about any of them, even Kettlewell’s coming out as their leader and later changing his mind felt unbelievable. It felt driven by the plot and not the characters…which really brought down the episode in a major way. One of the more forgettable villains in Doctor Who for sure.

So how does the episode hold up? The companions are great, Tom Baker is great as the 4th Doctor, Harry is good and Sarah is fantastic…and the Robot is even good too. But the writing and “The Think Tank,” are just bad. I mean really really bad. The premise had so much promise but than the things that should be explored more (The Robot’s formation of morality) are left to the side for boring mustache twirling villainy from an uninteresting organization of baddies. This really brings the episode down. Because of this, I would hesitantly recommend this episode…there is a lot of good, but the bad is really bad.

My final score for this episode is 7.4 / 10

The Fourth Doctor

12 Days of Doctors – The 3rd Doctor – Season 7, Episode 1 – “The Spearhead From Space” – The Beginning of an Exile

Spearhead_from_Space

We continue 12 Days of Doctors with the count up to 12th’s first Adventure with the 3rd Doctor. This was the first time Doctor Who appeared in color and also the first episode that had UNIT helping the Doctor against the current threat, as well as the introduction as well as the introduction of Jon Pertwee at the Third Doctor.

“The Spearhead From Space,” was written by Robert Holmes and directed by Derek Martinus. Producer Derrick Sherman oversaw the change between Troughton to Pertwee and the new direction the show would take.

The story begins with strange meteors crashing into the Earth, one of which is the Doctor in the TARDIS. He is taken in by UNIT (United Nations Intelligence Task Force) as UNIT tries to figure out what happened as only a piece of one of the strange alien cylinders that fell is found by them and it is broken. Liz is brought onto the scene by the Brigadier to help solve things and after the Doctor is attacked by assassins from the life-form that landed he begins working with The Brig and Liz  to find out what it is…at least until Liz gets him his key to the TARDIS and he finds that the Time Lords have permanently exiled him on Earth in the time period it takes place in forcing him to help solve the crisis and accept his exile. From here the story unfolds.

Dr Who: Spearhead From Space

Here is the assessment of the episode:

The Pros: The Brig – Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart is the most famous leaders of UNIT and the only person who had met the Doctor prior in this episode since he met him during the 2nd Doctor’s run. He is the prime factor helping and hindering the Doctor, as he knows he needs the Doctor but also respects the Doctor. He is the one who listens when the Doctor gives advice and acts on it. He is definitely a companion, though not in the fly around in the TARDIS way companion. In this episode we see him help focus the Doctor on the threat at hand and protect him from the threat. He makes a deal with the Doctor at an end to give him a lab and supplies to help fix the TARDIS as well as clothes and a car.

Liz – Liz is one of the famous companions during the 3rd Doctor’s run. We see her as indepdent and a skeptic when we first meet her, not wanting to be used by UNIT until her curiousity is made strong enough and we see her complex relationship with the Doctor too. She is the one who helps him fight the Nestene Consciousness (that later appears to face the 9th Doctor in his first adventure with a companion) and save the people who have been paralyzed so their Auton (plastic people) forms can reek havok. She is one of the companions I have a lot of respect for as she holds her own and her identity isn’t dependent on the Doctor.

UNIT – It is great seeing UNIT mostly competent and in action. The Brig is the leader we see be the most effective, as his superior gets captured by the Nestene’s human speaker Channing and turned into one of the first Autons to infiltrate society. They have a big battle at the end which helps limit the damage the Nestene Cons. causes.

The Nestene Consciousness – Is a great threat and an interesting looking alien. It is an alien made of pure energy that separates itself into different parts and once combined together is able to form a tentacle monster that nearly kills the Doctor. My one issue with it is we don’t know why it wants to conquer Earth. It is a great threat in the episode though.

The Use of Color – The use of color is used really well, from the Doctor’s black gentelmenlike outfit he steals from a doctor…too the dark coats with the pale faces of the Autons. You can see everything happen and it makes the story beautiful to watch.

The Third Doctor / The 3rd Doctor – Jon Pertwee is fantastic. While the First Doctor was the Professor, and the Second Doctor was the buffoon manipulator…the Third Doctor is the gentlemen. We see this in the clothes he chooses and how apologetic he is about every time he messes up. We see him try to run we when he gets the key, and that is when he discovers his punishment for getting involved with humanity and time was more than a forced regeneration…it was exile on the world he was so active in. You can see the sadness in his eyes when he realizes this and this informs his performance too. He is here on Earth because he has to be and also he is still the Doctor a protector. We see his scientific mind at work in helping defeat the Nestene Cons. and that Liz and he have great chemistry when they team up.

Okay: The Supporting Cast – The Factory owner and former factory owner who eventually turn against the Nestene Cons. are pretty one note. They aren’t bad but their roles are predictable and their performances aren’t elevated in anyway. Same goes for the poacher who finds and keeps part of the Nestene’s Cons.

Okay/Con: Channing – He isn’t all that unique as a villain. He takes control of a doll making faculty and the Nestene Cons. promises him power, but other than that he has no motivation. He has power over the Autons I guess, but what was he promised beyond survival. He does alright in the role and he’s not a bad villain, there just isn’t much there.

The 3rd Doctor’s run had a fair amount of episodes saved thankfully, and Jon Pertwee is a pleasure to watch. This episode is a good episode and a good introduction to him as the Third Doctor. It definitely gets a recommendation from me, even though the story and baddies aren’t as good as those from “The Power of the Daleks.” Jon Pertwee is one of the best, you can never go wrong with the Brigadier and Liz is a great companion.

Final score for this episode is 8.5 / 10

Spearhead from Space (3)

12 Days of Doctors – The 2nd Doctor – Season 4, Episode 3 – “The Power of the Daleks” – The Daleks’ Manipulation

power-of-the-daleks
“The Power of the Daleks,” is our first introduction to Patrick Troughton as the Second Doctor along with his companions Polly and Ben. As seen from the title it is one of the early Dalek episodes and involves the Doctor getting his bearing under his new regeneration and trying to solve the crisis on the human colony world of Vulcan where he is mistaken for the examiner and soon finds himself caught in a revolution against the Governor of the colony by his head of security Bragen.

This is the 2nd Doctor in our 12 Days of Doctors count up to 12th’s first Adventure.

“The Power of the Daleks,” is one of the missing episodes that I hope is eventually rediscovered. I was fortunate enough to find the story in two recreations on youtube. The links here for the first 5 parts:

and here for the final part 6:

I love these recreations as they are one of the only ways to see and hear what remains of the original work, and they are usually quite good at capturing the drama of the actors and the script. How does “The Power of the Daleks,” hold up? I’ll get into that in the  assessment.

Here is the assessment of the episode:

Power_of_the_Daleks

Pros: The Second Doctor / The 2nd Doctor – The Second Doctor is fantastic. Patrick Troughton is good at playing the buffoon who is also the trickster and in playing things stupid as he is able to figure out about Braden’s rebellion and the Dalek threat by pretending to be The Excaminer and is believed to be for most of the arc, and he eventually convince the Scientist Lesterson about the danger of the Daleks and to help him stop them after Braden has the Daleks kill the Governor. His relationship to his companions is great too as he comes off confused about who he is and recognizes he is the Doctor but no longer the Doctor he was before. We see him figure this out when he uses his “500 Year Diary,” and we also see his creativity when he creates a Sonic Key (precursor to what the screwdriver would be used for) to free his ally Quinn to fight the Daleks. He is also really good at the recorder.

Polly and Ben – The Doctor’s companions aren’t bad this episode and they actually do have character too. We see that Polly’s empathy is able to pull the rebels over to their side against the Daleks, and we see Ben’s ingenuity help the Doctor in his fight against them too. They aren’t useless…though Polly is a pretty big Damsel in Distress for a few of the parts, which is kind of annoying, as well as her comment about Ben being a real man and him rescuing her (when surprise he’s been captured too). They are still good companions. Not my favorite by a long shot (I like 2nd’s later companions of Zoe and Jamie much more), but they do their roles very well and are the clarity of voice in the Doctor’s more sly approach.

Lesterson – The scientist who has good intentions but is easily manipulated is this guys trope. He is a great character though, especially after he sees the Dalek rally in their ship and tries to convince his assistant Janley that he was wrong and the Daleks need to be stopped. He succeeds in this and sacrifices himself in order for the Doctor to overload the Dalek’s power and destroy them. He’s a fully 3 Dimensional character.

Janley – She’s ambitious (joining Bragen for power) but makes the right choice in the end when she realizes the Dalek’s mean to kill them all so works with the people she had originally back stabbed. She also dies in the process but her redemption arc is complete.

The Governor – I wish that Bragen had more reasons to kill him than ambition…when you first meet him he seems to have full control of the colony and their are hints of a dictatorship, but we never know for sure because Braden is so blatantly bad, which reveals that though the Governor is arrogant he does in fact care about the colony.

The Action – There is a lot of great action in this episode. Especially with the sheer quantity of Daleks and their manipulation the war between the Governor’s forces and the rebels. You can never tell where peoples’ loyalties lie until the Daleks arrive on the scene.

Rising Action – The Rising action is great, we see the factions established over a good amount of time as well as the plotting of the Daleks as they slowly take control. It is brilliant and there is a terror as they pretend to be good and eventually end up destroying most of the characters in the ship.

The Writing – Is brilliant. There is lots of showing and not telling. David Whitaker did a great job with this script and Christopher Barry was fantastic on direction.

Okay – Bragen – This guy could have had reasons beyond ambition, instead he plays up the paranoia once in power and we do see his regret when a Dalek asks, “Why do humans kill humans?” It is a brilliant critique of us in that one statement and the anger in Bragen’s eyes since right after goes full Dalek and turns on the people who aren’t part of his security force.

Quinn – The Doctor’s ally and the Governor’s second in command, this guy isn’t really memorable. He is generic good there at the end to pick up the pieces of the broken colony that has lost all power and many of the people. He serves his role, just isn’t super memorable.

This was a fantastic episode that I highly recommend. I can’t wait until the first recreation finishes up Part 6, since that recreation was superior to the second that played more like a radio drama with scenes overlaid. It was still really good and this is one of my favorite episodes now that I recommend to any lover of the 2nd Doctor and Classic Who.

My final score for this episode is 9.5 / 10.

Second Doctor Power of the Daleks

12 Days of Doctors – The 1st Doctor – Season 1, Episode 1 – “An Unearthly Child” – An Okay Start

An Unearthly Child

“An Unearthly Child,” with William Hartnell is the first ever Doctor Who episode. The episode was broadcast on November 23rd, 1963. The writer for the episode was Anthony Coburn and Webber and the director was Waris Hussein. This was a big risk to take, no one had really done the concept of the time traveling man in a tv series before this. How does the episode hold up? Well I’ll get into that in the assessment.

“An Unearthly Child,” begins with two teachers Barbara and Ian worrying about their new pupil Susan who has been both super brilliant and in their minds oblivious on a lot of things. When they go to where she lives they find nothing there but eventually are drawn to a police box. From here they run into The Doctor her grandfather and the conflict unfolds.

Here is the assessment of the episode:

Pros: The idea – The idea is fantastic. A time traveling alien who looks like us visiting the present with his granddaughter. Why is he there? Why can’t he get home? These are the questions that are posed to us in the first episode as well as reveal how would a refugee alien interact with species that he is so much more advanced than technologically.

An Unearthly Child 13

The First Doctor – I like the First Doctor, you have a guy who tackles the world from a point of separation because for him most of this has already happened, not to mention he fears Susan getting hurt or people learning about who he is initially. It is only because of Susan that Ian and Barbara learn who he is and he deals with their denial of it (largely from Ian) for a good portion of the episode. I don’t know anyone who would willingly choose to put up with that. He is old but he is also childlike too, at one point he traps Ian and Barbara and when Susan says she will leave him with them…leaving him alone he turns on the T.A.R.D.I.S. (Time and Relative Dimension in Space) in order to run away from them revealing him to the world and running away from Susan leaving. This running is a major part of his character and why he wasn’t on Gallifrey in the first place. Hartnell is fantastic in the role.

TARDIS An Unearthly Child

The T.A.R.D.I.S. – Looks like a police box, inside is shows the larger interior of the space ship. It is a great introduction to this vehicle and we get to see it go back in time when the First Doctor runs away with them in it.

Okay/Con – The Companions – The teachers are concerned but are unable to accept the truth that is right in front of them, Susan is also pretty useless too. She is the innocent who must be protected and the one time she tries having agency leads to the Doctor running. Susan, Barbara and Ian are basically generic people in this…which is a shame since Susan is a Time Lord too, but we don’t really get that beyond her knowledge that she most likely got from the Doctor, making her no more than a generic human companion who those with agency (the Teachers and the Doctor) try to protect.

Execution – The teachers are stalking a student because they are worried, and Susan does not look 15. This would have worked much better at a British University or school where her disappearance tied to her age would be more noticed, or cast someone who looks like they are a teenager.

So, how is the first outing with the Doctor and our first time with the First Doctor? It is Okay. The T.A.R.D.I.S. and the Doctor are the best parts, but the script isn’t really elevated. I would have continued watching if I was watching it when it first aired cause I’d be curious where they were taken to and I would like to see more character development from the companions and learn more about the Doctor. I wish the Doctor had been introduced earlier in the episode, we don’t even meet him until it is already halfway though and Barbara and Ian cannot carry the script.

I recommend it because it is the first episode, but it is very average and forgettable. Going to give it an extra point because it does introduce us to the Doctor and the T.A.R.D.I.S. though.

Final score is 6 / 10.

12 Days of Doctors – A Count up to 12th’s First Adventure

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As a lover of science fiction, creative story and history…Doctor Who both the new and classic took to me pretty quickly. My first Doctor will always be the 10th Doctor with Tennant and Series 2 when Rose was his companion. It was episodes from this that pulled me into the new series and later into the old classic series.

Each of the actors was great at making the Doctor their own, while still remaining mostly true to continuity and core personality traits…though within those core traits certain Doctors emphasize more greater than others. Regeneration changes the Doctor even if he still remains the Doctor and it is fascinating how both the writers, actors and directors tackle this issue.

The things I’m going to be looking at most besides how good the story is and how well it is directed is the Doctors’ relationship to their companions. It is in this that you can really gauge how great a Doctor is as a person, even if the episode or movie sucks. Companions reveal the Doctors’ humanity and that is one of the most fascinating things about the show…besides the alien perspective used to show us the good and bad within our own natures. When the show is at it’s best…it can teach us about ourselves through showing rather than telling and inspire us to be better.

Since the regeneration of the 11th Doctor I’ve been looking forward to doing this (though not looking forward to the first 6th Doctor Episode “The Twin Dilemma,” or the Doctor Who Movie for the 8th Doctor). The rest from what I remember is very enjoyable and solid and some of these introductory episodes to the Doctors are ones I have not had the time to see yet. The episodes that I will be reviewing leading up to 12th Doctor and his pilot episode “Deep Breath,” are:

“An Unearthly Child” – The 1st Doctor

“The Power of the Daleks” – The 2nd Doctor

“The Spearhead from Space” – The 3rd Doctor

“Robot” – The 4th Doctor

“Castrovalva” – The 5th Doctor

“The Twin Dilemma” – The 6th Doctor

“Time and the Rani” – The 7th Doctor

The Doctor Who Movie – The 8th Doctor

“Rose” – The 9th Doctor

“The Christmas Invasion” – The 10th Doctor

“The 11th Hour” – The 11th Doctor

and ending on “Deep Breath,” for the 12th. I will not be including the War Doctor because the 50th Anniversary episode is an episode for another day, and he isn’t one of the Numbered Doctors, though he is a fascinating Doctor nonetheless. Now without further ado and in the leadup to the premiere on August 25th, “Allons-y!”

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