Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (2018): Structure Hinders the Touching Remembrance

This is the first documentary I’ve reviewed and it is also one that is solidly good. Seriously, before I get into analyzing this film, go and see it. If you have any attachment to the past and having PBS’s “Mister Rodgers’ Neighborhood” as what you knew growing up, this film is worth it. Before I say anything else, this film is worth checking out for how it explores who Fred Rodgers was. A great documentary is hard to do, and this doesn’t reach the levels of great, good is as good as it gets.

The documentary was directed by Morgan Neville and covers the life of Fred Rogers, focusing on his story as told through the show and his relationship with the people on the show, as well as what lead him to PBS in the first place.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Beginning – The story starts out with how Fred Rodgers wanted to go into Christian Ministry and decided pretty early on that television would be the best way to do this. Before this he studied child psychology to inform his ministry and we learn about the early show he created with his wife before the creation of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.”

The Psychology of Fred Rodgers – One of the running themes of the show is the exploration of Fred Rodger’s psychology. This is used in the characters on his show as he grew up in an environment that looked down on showing emotion so he used his puppet characters to express his feelings. This became a way for him to actively listen as well as he would use the characters to form connections with the children he’d help on the show. The show expresses this with Daniel Tiger who is the shy part of Mr. Rodger’s psychology. He’s vulnerable and the show expresses that this is the closest we get to seeing the real man, though many characters say he becomes King Friday by the end of his career where he becomes gruffer and focused on his legacy, while still being the Tiger but the Tiger is now the King.

Love – One of the running themes of the documentary is that of love. Fred Rodger’s love of the kids he would visit or who would visit him as part of the show, love of his crew and the relationships he built there and his relationship with his wife. Each of these explores a different aspect of the man as for them he was a friend and sometimes even a surrogate father as his love was so genuine. One of the strongest stories is how Francois Clemens came out of the closet to Mr. Rodgers and ended up adopting him as a surrogate dad, even as he was living closeted for the show to keep it’s funding.

Imagination – The other theme is that of imagination. Mr. Rodgers never goes to the land of Make Believe and because he doesn’t go a whole world is expressed there created from imagination. This is a world with a royal family, living animals and humans who interact with them. Often he would use this world to tackle real world issues like the horrors of Vietnam and death as some of the plots involved characters sending messages of love, that lead to King Friday tearing down the wall he made separating himself from the Kingdom. I have fond memories of the Land of Make Believe. Seeing the work that was put into that magic was inspiring.

The Cons:

Structure – The structure of the documentary doesn’t work. There are times it really lags and some of the sections could have been much smaller while other sections, especially as they related to Fred Rodgers the man, could have been expanded on. In many ways this is a documentary about the show, and I liked that but in focusing so much on the show we miss out more on learning who Fred Rodgers was. How did his ministry inform his relationships? What was his relationship like with the people we’ve met in his old age? How was he like King Friday at the end? These are all questions that never really get answered beyond surface level. This isn’t a deep dive documentary, which would have made it great if it had.

This is a really good documentary that is well worth your time if you grew up watching “Mister Rodgers’ Neighborhood.” In this film you will see the depths of compassion and love this complex man had for humanity, as well as the creative mind that made a show that connected with millions over generations. I’m glad that this gets to be the first documentary I review for the blog. Check it out, if you have the chance.

Final Score: 8.6 / 10

 

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Mute (2018): This is no “Blade Runner”

Netflix is the new Blockbuster in more ways than one. Any place where you have a concentration of films you have copycats and crap ripping off much better films. “Mute” is a film that rips from the world of “Blade Runner,” but doesn’t have anything to say on its own. This film was awful, and one of the most disappointing films I’ve seen in a while.

The film was directed and co-written by Duncan Jones (the director behind the “Warcraft” film) and Michael Robert Johnson.

The story follows Leo, an Amish immigrant to Germany, who has lost his vocal cords after an accident. When his girlfriend, Naadirah, goes missing he investigates her hidden life as the dark underbelly of dystopian Berlin is revealed.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Cinematography – This is a beautiful looking film. The neon colors and the future tech are great. The neon lights bring out the dark mystery of the environment and how shady most of the people in this world are. Gary Shaw, cinematographer, is the only person who truly did well with this film as the film’s cinematography is one of the few things about the film that works.

The Idea of the Story – I am a fan of noirs and mysteries and this is both of those things, as well as Sci-Fi. Like “Blade Runner,” we are learning about this broken world and how each person relates to one another as the mystery of Naadirah’s disappearance is slowly revealed. That is the idea anyway, nothing else works.

The Cons:

The Characters – The characters are all terrible people. Even Leo is shown to be as dark as those around him as he is willing to do anything to others ,and only cares about his girlfriend and that is it. Naadirah is manipulative and using those around her. And the antagonist, Cactus, and his friend, Duck, are creeps who don’t have arcs. They just exist as a threat to Leo, as they are doctors for the mob and Cactus killed Naadirah.

The Story – The story is crap. How Leo discovers each bit of the puzzle and how deep Naadirah was in with the gangs is a muddled mess. What story is here involves Cactus trying to escape with his daughter as he keeps having to do more jobs for the mob, and Leo gets closer to finding out that he is the killer. It sucks and the fact that Leo adopts Cactus’s daughter as his own after killing him has no real lead-up or payoff. However, Cactus and his friend give Leo vocal cords so he can speak, so that is a thing… I guess. It just happens. God I hated this story.

This is the worst film I’ve seen this year, thus far. It is a film that failed to develop characters, and unlike “Blade Runner,” had no deeper point. It took a cool idea of a mute protagonist and wasted it. What made hate this movie more than I usually would was the world is presented beautifully and I am a fan of Sci-Fi Noirs. I was ready to explore this world and find interesting characters. In the end I learned nothing about the world and the characters were some of the worst written in film.

Final Score: 3 / 10 Nothing worked except the cinematography.

 

Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018): A Fun Ride With No Payoff

 “Ant-Man and the Wasp” is alright. This is a film that if you enjoyed the first one you will probably enjoy this one. It hits a lot of the same notes, has a bit more of ensemble cast, but is much less focused and the first film had a much better villain and climax. This film stays at the level of good, but never rises to great throughout its entire run.

The film was directed by Peyton Reed, and has five writing credits, one of whom is Paul Rudd. Given that, no wonder it never quite rises to greatness. Films written by committee don’t tend to have the singular focus and vision that makes those unforgettable films.

The story follows Hank Pym and his daughter, Hope, as they attempt to invent a machine to bring back Hank’s wife, Janet, from the Quantum Realm. They discover the key lies in Scott Lang’s memories, so they kidnap him. He must help them get the supplies they need to finish the machine, while dealing with a gang who wants their lab and a mysterious threat called The Ghost, who is also after the lab for her own ends.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Action – The action for this film is solid. There are some captivating action set pieces, from the shrinking lab, a fight with a gang in hotel kitchen, and a car chase. All of which, make use of the shrinking and enlarging powers that the Pym’s hold through their tech. The fights with Ghost are also captivating, too, as she warps all over the place and is the hardest character to hit because of her quantum powers. The one thing I’ll say against this though, the action didn’t really feel like it pays off. It is all good action, but it never gives the climax I was hoping for.

Ant-Man and the Wasp – Ant-Man and the Wasp (Scott Lang and Hope) and the original (Hank and Janet) have some of the best dialogue and chemistry in the film. In Scott and Hope, we have Scott trying to live a normal life so he can be with his daughter after his time under house arrest is up. Hope is driven by the desire to save her mother by any means necessary, and is far better at the hero business than Scott is. For the original, Janet is the compassion to Hank Pym’s ornery distance. When they are together you see how the guilt he feels has driven him to distance himself from people, and she brings out the good in him. I really enjoyed their reunion and the flashback scenes. Lily, Rudd, Douglas and Pfeiffer are the best parts of the film.

Frank Pym’s Arc – Frank is the one character out of all the main characters who has an arc. His arc is to save his wife, and in doing so, save his family and redeem himself. He carries regret for not stopping the missile that she stopped by shrinking, and entering the Quantum Realm. I would have liked more exploration of this, but this is the throughline of the film and what made the film good in the end.

The After Credits Scene – In the after credits scene, Scott is shrunk down to get Quantum energy to help heal Ghost. While he is down there Thanos’ snap from Infinity War occurs and he is stuck. It is a powerful scene and one of the better Marvel After Credits scenes in any of these films.

Okay:

The Finale – I feel like the original knew how to better handle the climax and villain. Yellow Jacket was a fun villain, and the anti-Ant-Man who was only out for himself. He had elements of Iron Monger, from “Iron Man,” and like Iron Monger went out in a big fight that made use of the shrinking technology. It was funny and it rocked, where this finale was run of the mill. The most interesting element of the finale was Hank Pym shrinking into the Quantum Realm to find his wife. Outside of that, the characters fighting could have been anyone and it wouldn’t have changed a thing.

Cons:

What Consequences? – Ghost gets saved and stops fighting our heroes… it is implied they can save her for good, which in turn has turned her into an ally. The Pyms are still on the run from the government, so nothing has changed there and Janet is fine, even after being in the Quantum Realm for years, and she has Quantum powers now. This was a film with zero negative consequences. It took Thanos in another movie to create consequences, which is a major con. A great film needs stakes, and by the end I felt like they were non-existent or just weren’t high enough.

  If you enjoyed the first “Ant-Man,” you’ll enjoy this one. The writing is decent enough, the acting and action are mostly great, and it has a good amount of humor to keep the film going when it slows down. This is a good summer blockbuster escape, but I wouldn’t rate it any higher than that. This is a film that could have been more if it had bothered with stakes and had consequences for the actions of the characters.

Final Score: 8 / 10. Solid summer escape.

Hereditary (2018): Layers of Horror and History in a Beautiful Miniature

 

“Hereditary” thus far is my favorite movie of the year. This is a horror movie that does horror perfectly. It is a slow burn, keeping you horrified and scared for the characters the entire time. This film is difficult to watch in all the right ways, as horror is meant to be unsettling and to make you uncomfortable. This films does this phenomenally and gives compelling characters, powerful themes and a mystery that is never revealed until the end.

“Hereditary” was written and directed by Ari Aster. The story follows the Graham family, specifically the mother, Annie, who is a famous miniature artist who recreates moments from her past. She has a husband and 2 kids, each deals with the death of Annie’s mother in different ways as their shared trauma slowly drives them apart.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Tension and Tone – This is a film that is seeping with tension. The film is uncomfortable and creepy from the first scene, and you are left guessing where it is going to take you next. I was at the edge of my seat through most of the film, and that was because of how unsettling the tension and tone were. The movie goes through slow escalation ,and each scene adds more intensifying moments as you spend more time with the family while they fall apart.

The Cinematography – This is a beautiful film. There is symbolism in the artwork of Annie, who has created miniatures from her life experiences, and in the house they are in. Moments are captured in the miniatures that mirror or lead into horrifying events in reality. The use of shadows around the house is done really well too, as is the red light from the tree house that sits outside the home. This use of light is haunting and fits the themes where reality is becoming distorted for Annie, as she learns the truth about her mother.

When Family Falls Apart – The main drama is the family falling apart. Annie nearly killed her son and daughter when she sleepwalked (nearly set them on fire), the son hates her because of it. Her daughter also saw the grandmother as her mother as she was nursed from birth by the grandmother who sought to indoctrinate her. From the get go the only stable part of Annie’s life is her husband. After Annie’s daughter is accidentally killed in a car crash by her son things deteriorate further as she starts seeing ghosts, and more sinister forces manipulate her grief. The characters are all compelling, and the father is especially  intriguing, as he is torn between protecting and loving his son, and taking care of and loving his wife. 

Occult or Mental Illness? – One of the things I liked is that the film is ambiguous on whether it is a history of extreme mental illness that is causing the meltdown, or if it is the cult and the demon that actually exist. By the end it is implied that the demon does exist and ends up possessing the son after the grandmother, mother and daughter have all died. But, even given that fact… the demon works as metaphor, given that it is the unaddressed illness and trauma that are passed on, and in the end destroy the house. It is beautiful and terrifying and works on multiple levels.  

 This is a film that I highly recommend if you are into horror movies. The characters are compelling and you care about all of them. None of the family members are bad people, they are just so broken, and caught in things so far out of their control, that tragedy is the only realistic end the story can tell. This is my favorite movie of this genre, and I’m not a fan of the occult type horror films, however, ghost stories or monster films are more of my jam. The occult is perfect for the story this movie tells, though, and it is a masterpiece well worth your time.

Final Score: 10 / 10

Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) – Stupid Title in a Great Adventure

“Solo: A Star Wars Story” is a stupid title. We know the film is about Han Solo, so adding that is “A Star Wars Story” tells us nothing we don’t already know. Given that they wanted to make a Trilogy out of this film I’m not sure how they’d show they are different, but I’m good with the sequels having different titles. Beyond my gripe about this title, I really liked this movie and thought it was a great. This was a film that explores the underworld of “Star Wars” where there are thieves, pirates and gangsters and no one is to be trusted. I enjoyed this film so much that I would watch sequels as the core cast and story were compelling and I found myself entranced through this entire side adventure within the Star Wars Franchise.

The film was directed by Ron Howard, (after the original directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller were fired) and written by Jonathan and Lawrence Kasdan.

The story follows the adventures of Han Solo and explores how he became the smuggler we know in “A New Hope.” I’ll get more into that later on but the core of the plot is how he gets the Millennium Falcon and his motivation for going into the smuggler life. 

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The “Star Wars” Underworld – The underworld is one of the core parts of the Star Wars films. We see Jabba and his palace in “Return of the Jedi” and get glimpses of the underworld of Coruscant in the prequels and in series like “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” tv series. I like this world… this is a world where money and power run everything and even the Empire stays out of their way. It is here, where we see characters make difficult and dark choices, as a matter of course and “Solo” does not disappoint in that regards. This film develops the underworld and we see the toll it takes on those who are forced into it or choose to become a part of it.

The Cloud Riders – This is a pirate group that is always getting in on Beckett’s jobs, as we see, he and the leader have a history with one another. I won’t spoil what happens with them, but there is more to them than meets the eye and, like everyone in this movie, they are far more complex than they first appear to be.

Tobias Beckett and his Crew – Woody Harrelson is fantastic as Beckett, a corrupt guy out for himself but, also, caring, as we see he’s married to his partner Val and clearly loves her. As well as, great rapport with his pilot, Rio, an alien with four arms and attitude. Eventually Chewie and Han join this group on a train heist job. The crew has a great dynamic and I would have watched a show about the 5 of them. Han joins them after he discovers their con and becomes part of their crew. 

Dryden Vos and the Crimson Dawn – Paul Bettany plays an amazing villain. This is a guy who reeks threat and charm as he invades peoples’ space, and does all he can to disarm them before ever having to fight them. You can tell why he became leader of the Crimson Dawn, as he flies in a huge ship to track his assets to make sure they finish their jobs. His power is far reaching, too, as Qi’ra and Han were orphans under the control of Lady Proxima, and now she is under Vos and the Crimson Dawn’s control. His organization has become one of the most powerful gangs in the galaxy. 

Lando – Donald Glover captures Lando’s charm beautifully. Young Lando is a gambler who does what he wants, and will cheat to win. This provides an interesting dynamic with Han who is idealistic and good at this point, where Lando shows the direction Han will go. Lando, of course, owns the Millennium Falcon and his co-pilot is L3, a droid who believes in equal rights for droids and has a complicated relationship with Lando.

Han and Chewbacca – Han and Chewbacca are the heart of the film, as we see that they have each others back on multiple occasions. Initially they start out distrusting each other and depending on one another for simple survival, but with each sacrifice they make for each other, they soon become partners and close friends by the end of the film.

Okay:

Qi’ra – Qi’ra is Han’s childhood friend and love interest. Amelia Clarke does a decent job in the role, but I wouldn’t call her super memorable. She plays her part in the advancement of the plot and there are some great twists with her character, but I feel more could have been done. I wanted more scenes of her with Han, so their relationship could be developed further and so that the romance would feel more real.

Fanservice – Want to learn how characters got their nicknames or names? Want to know why the Falcon looks why it does? Want to get some “A New Hope” references? Well, you will get all this, and more, in this film. It never gets as bad as “Rogue One” in the references and the original characters carry the film. So much of the fanservice wasn’t needed and I would have preferred we never had the questions answered.

The Cons:

The Cinematography – The cinematography is really dark. There were times I had trouble seeing what was going on on screen and had to depend wholly on what I heard the characters were saying, rather than what I was seeing. This was a huge detriment and what kept the film from being the perfect film of its type.

“Solo: A Star Wars Story” was a film that as far as I know, no one was asking for, but in the end I was glad it got made. Hearing about the development hell, from the firing of the first directors, to hiring an acting coach for the lead… I was ready to hate this film. I had no expectations and was really annoyed this film even existed. “Solo” has now become one of my favorite “Star Wars” films. The film takes risks by giving us a world where no one can be trusted and the status quo is loss. I would watch sequels to this film, and cared far more about the characters here than I did anyone in “Rogue One.” If you like “Star Wars” or heist films, check it out. It is well worth your time and for me it did not disappoint.

Final Score: 9.4 / 10

Avengers: Infinity War (2018) – The Power of a Compelling Villain

“Infinity War” is easily in my Top 5 MCU films. This is a film I saw a second time before writing this review, and the only other Superhero films that have been that lucky were “The Dark Knight” and “The Dark Knight Rises.” As you can tell from those and this film, I enjoy my superhero films depressing or bittersweet. This is a film that hits you over the head with loss, and doesn’t stop until the end. Thanos is the villain, but also the protagonist, as his actions drive the film and force our heroes to make choices that define them before the loss comes. I’ll get into spoilers deeper into the review, but for now, this is a film I highly recommend.

This film was directed by the Russo Brothers, written by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, while being produced by Kevin Feige.

The story involves the Avengers trying to stop Thanos from getting all the Infinity Stones (cosmically powerful stones born at the Big Bang, and scattered through the Universe), as when he does, he plans to wipe out half the universe.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Universe – It is the Marvel Cinematic Universe… a universe full of aliens, cultures, clashing personalities, heroes, villains and in the end consequences. There is a reason I’ve become so drawn into the comic books. What Marvel and Disney have done is to interpret so much of that beautifully on the screen, and each new film I like returning to this enjoyable and fascinating world.

The Superhero Teams – The driving action of the film is the team-ups between different heroes. Characters clash and have to work out their conflicts in order to take on Thanos to keep him from destroying half the population of the Universe. I’ll cover what I liked about the teams below.

Bruce Banner and the Secret Avengers – The film kicks off with Thanos killing Loki and knocking out the Hulk. The Hulk is saved by Heimdall and sent to Earth where Hulk retreats into Bruce Banner. From here we see Banner reunite with the Avengers, and have to depend on his brains to take on the Black Order, as Hulk is afraid to come out after losing to Thanos. It is wonderful seeing this dynamic in action, with those in Wakanda, as he fights in Tony’s Hulkbuster armor against the alien swarm. Banner has always been the outcast in the Avengers, and now that he’s back he can’t even depend on his power as the Hulk. This forces him to adapt to thinking things through as Banner, as he realizes he has deeper issues to explore with the Hulk. I can’t wait to see where his arc goes with the Hulk and the Avengers in “Avengers 4.”

Spider-Man, Doctor Strange and Iron Man – This dynamic is fun. To kick things off, Doctor Strange is the one who doesn’t care about people (he tells Tony and Peter that he will let them die before he gives Thanos the Time Stone). Spidey is full of pop culture references that annoy Tony, and Tony Stark is always trying to take control, which leads to conflict with Doctor Strange because of it. They succeed in taking out a member of the Black Order, but face deadly fallout when they reach Titan, Thanos’ homeworld, to battle the Mad Titan himself.

Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax and Mantis – 3 of this group eventually team up with Spidey, Strange, and Stark against Thanos… which happens after Gamora is kidnapped by Thanos, as she knows the destination of the Soul Stone. She has some powerful scenes with Star-Lord, and some funny scenes with Drax.

Rocket, Groot and Thor – This was my favorite team up, it happens after the Guardians of the Galaxy rescue Thor from his destroyed refugee ship. Thor’s ship was destroyed by Thanos when he picked up the Space Stone from Loki, before Thanos kills Loki. It is the death of Heimdall and Loki, and half of Asgard that have Thor full of anger and broken. This leads to Rocket stepping up to be the Captain and helping Thor through the process of healing, as they head to the legendary location of Nidavellir, so that Thor can create a god killing weapon. Groot is a teenager and full of attitude, but steps up to the plate when he contributes part of himself to making Thor’s new weapon.

The Story Arc of Thanos – Thanos is the protagonist of this film. It is desire for balance in the universe (which he believes can only come about through genocide after his planet is destroyed from running out of resources and overpopulation) that drives his desire for the Infinity Stones. Each stone costs him, as the members of the Black Order are all eventually killed by the Avengers. To get the Soul Stone he has to sacrifice the only one he ever loved (Gamora), and getting the Mind Stone out of Vision nearly costs him his life, when Thor attacks him with the God killing weapon. In the end he wins and wipes out half the universe. Where his story goes from here remains to be seen, as he achieved his goal, and as far as he knows… he is the monster who brought balance to the universe. Josh Brolin truly did a masterful job and is easily one of the best villains in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Okay:

The Black Order – These 4 look really cool but weren’t as effective as they could have been. I would have liked at least one of them to kill one of the good guys. They might be back now that Thanos has all the Infinity Stones, so they could get more development later on… we’ll just have to wait and see.

The Battle in Wakanda – The Battle in Wakanda is pretty generic compared to most of the other fights in the film. Most of the other fights involve use of the environment and powers to try and stop the Mad Titan, where here it is a bunch of expendable aliens against a group of superheroes and soldiers all lined up. It is like every other “big battle.” It still looked good, but the genericness of it all kept it from being a truly memorable part of the film. It was the kind of action we see in every other MCU film.

Pacing – The first time I saw this film I didn’t notice any pacing issues. The second time I watched I thought the beginning could have been cut down and happened faster, the Battle of Wakanda is too long, and Thanos needed more scenes with people. Each film develops him further, and with better pacing we could have gotten more of that, or least more exploration of his faction, the Black Order.

The team ups, the comedy, the action, the characters and their arcs… there is so much I have to recommend about this film. This is a film that could have been a gigantic mess, given how large the cast was, and all the different parts that are in play. The Russo Brothers managed to pull it off. Once again, showing why they are the ones shaping the story of the MCU. If you haven’t seen this movie yet, do it. This is a film that is well worth your time and shows just how powerful stories can be.

Final Score: 9.8 / 10

 

Black Panther (2018): Seeking Justice in a Broken World

       “Black Panther” is easily one of my Top 5 favorite MCU films. This is a film that expands on the lore of the MCU, has great characters with amazing arcs, some of the best action and villains in any Marvel film. It also explores deeper themes of resistance and sovereignty adding up to a movie that is well worth your time.

The film was directed by Ryan Coogler who co-wrote it with Joe Robert Cole and produced by Kevin Feige.

The story involves T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), after “Captain America: Civil War,” as he takes the mantle as King of Wakanda but suddenly finds his world transformed as an enemy from Wakanda’s past upsets the status quo they’ve known for so long. This forces him and his allies to confront the past and what the choices they make will mean for Wakanda’s future.

SPOILERS Ahead

The Pros:

Wakanda – Wakanda is such a cool country. This is a Afro-Futuristic nation with advanced technology, hidden by a cloaking device that intermixes ancient tradition with tech. Wakandans are ruled by the King and a Tribal Council whose upholding of tradition drives the primary conflict in the shaping of Wakanda’s future. Each tribe differs in ideology, whether it is defending the King, the Border or trade. This world is rich and fully realized, each tribe is distinct and I wanted to know more about their histories in the foundation and development of Wakanda.

The Characters – The characters are definitely one of the most enjoyable parts of this great film, with Boseman once again killing it as T’Challa. Whitiker is fantastic as the Tribal Shaman whose history is intertwined with Wakanda’s past sins. The other minor characters, like the tribal leader W’Kabi, also have intriguing performances as well. In many cases it is these characters prideful choices that drive the conflict that T’Challa must untangle. Below, I’m going to explore some of my favorite characters of the film, as it was who they were that drew me into the story the most.

Okoye – Okoye, played by Danai Gurira, is Wakanda’s General and she owns this role. Not only does she one of the major focuses is some breathtaking actions scenes every action scenes, we see how important her role is for her as at one point following tradition has her on the opposite side of some of our heroes. She serves the Crown and Wakanda, and that is a complicated dance when T’Challa is believed dead and the sociopath Killmonger is now King of Wakanda. I can’t wait to see more of her in future films.

Shuri – Shuri is the Princess of Wakanda and T’Challa’s sister. She is one of the most intelligent characters in the MCU, as she is the inventor of the advanced technology of Wakanda, she is very much the Tony Stark of Wakanda.  Like Stark, she doesn’t care about tradition and is far more invested in the relationships around her and the beauty of discovery and invention. She has some great scenes, and like Okoye, she was one of the main reasons to see this film. 

Ulysses Klaue – Andy Serkis has a lot of fun as the weapons merchant who is almost Joker-like in how little he cares about anything. This is a guy who is selfish, and racist, and every reason why Wakanda is isolationist. He is an insane character and his chaotic and manipulative nature leads to some explosive conflict in the first act of the film. It is also great to see Serkis in anything. 

Killmonger – Michael B. Jordan’s Killmonger might be one of Marvel’s most complicated villains. This is a boy who grew up homeless in Oakland when T’Challa’s father kills his father, who was connected to the royal family through blood. He is driven by revenge from this moment on, but also by a desire to help the oppressed, driven by all he has lost. Killmonger is also a complete sociopath (his body is covered in self-inflicted scars for every person he has killed), but that doesn’t stop him from being complex. You can see where he is coming from, even if his way of going about it is all wrong.

Isolationism and its Consequences – The main idea explored is isolationism and the consequences of it is the main theme of the movie. T’Challa’s father commits a grave sin to keep Wakanda hidden from the rest of the world and it is up to T’Challa to face the consequences of his father’s sins. As Killmonger reminds T’Challa there are Africans both on the continent and in the world that Wakanda left behind. Wakanda let great evils like slavery, apartheid and countless other atrocities take place, when they could have done something to fight it. The primary conflict within Wakanda is to become an Empire to help oppressed groups (Killmonger’s vision), or stay hidden and protect Wakandan technology from those who would use it for ill (T’Challa’s father’s vision). T’Challa’s arc is finding that balance between perspectives and owning the mistakes of the past…and it is beautifully executed.

Okay:

Final Fight -The final fight is fine but compared to the rest of the film comes off as weak, especially in regards to the relationship between Okoye and W’Kabi. The emotional setup earlier in the film does not add up to the payoff during this fight, and so much more could have been done with some of the locations.

Okoye and W’Kabi – These two are star-crossed lovers who are on opposite sides and leaders of their tribes. I wanted more with both of them as they are both great actors, but we never got to see them in love, it is only ever given to us through exposition. Fully fleshing out their relationship could have given us the perfect film. 

This is a film that had the Marvel problem only in that Act 3 was still a battle, and there were some plot holes that I wish had been expanded upon. Regardless, this is a film that is deserving of all the hype and praise it has been receiving. It really is that good and I can’t wait to see what else they do with T’Challa and the Wakandans in later films. This film has social awareness you don’t always get in action films and at the core it seeks justice in a broken world.

Final Score: 9.7 / 10 One of my favorite films of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

If you noticed something different about this review it is because I am now working with an editor! He is friend Brandon Cabusas and you can find him on instagram @brandoncabusas. If you need editing work, you should check him out.