Tag Archives: Addiction

The Langoliers (1995): A Good Idea that Didn’t Need the Monsters

   “The Langoliers” is an infamous Stephen King film. The Nolstalgia Critic did an early takedown of some of the more hokey aspects of it. This is not a good film, the acting and writing are awkward and it could have been cut way down in length. The thing is though, I don’t hate this film. The core idea and the tone are actually handled really well and the Stephen King theme of people being our own worst enemies is done beautifully given the other limitations listed above. I’ll get into what I mean deeper into the review.

The mini-series was directed by Tom Holland who co-wrote it with Stephen King. The film is inspired by Stephen King’s short story Four Past Midnight.

The story involves a bunch of passengers who find themselves trapped on a plane in which all the passengers have disappeared. From here they must find out what is going on, where the other passengers are and where they’ve been transported to.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros: The Tone – The tone of this tv show is actually pretty great. There is a sense of foreboding, isolation and paranoia. The characters are trapped and it pervades the piece in how the music and scenes are presented. We get scenes of silence where we are in the head of our characters and the mystery author being a major character leaves the trap as something to be un-weaved, increasing the sense of isolation and paranoia.

Isolation and the Consequences of It – Stephen King loves exploring what fear does to people, especially when people are cut off from society. “The Mist” film did this extremely well and the book “The Stand” and even aspects of the Gunslingers world encapsulate this too. This theme is handled decently in this film. We see how isolation drives our characters insane and causes conflict between them, eventually leading to one of the folks who is already unstable, going off the deep end and breaking down, becoming a threat to everyone else who is still alive.

Unseen Terror – We don’t see the Langoliers (the time monsters) until the end and it is the fact that we don’t see them that really helps increase the foreboding tone and sense of isolation. We see time collapsing on itself at one point and that is terrifying enough as our characters are in a race against time and don’t even know if they have a way out. It is in the fact that we don’t know what these creatures are that keep up the tension, we hear them approaching and see how it makes the characters afraid and that is enough.

Exploring the Nature of Time – At the end of the day this is a time travel story. Our crew passes through an event where they find themselves in the past and learn that time gets destroyed by the Langoliers as it catches up to the present and as they pass into the future they realize they can get ahead of the present as well.

The Cons: The Writing – The writing is not very good, it is actually kind of bad. The characters are all tell and no show and it is a major thing that brings the story down. The best parts of this film are when characters are silent or the moments of implication in a backstory. A character not sharing their backstory is when this film is strong. This was co-wrote by Stephen King, but that couldn’t save the problems in the script.

The Performances – The performances are a bit stilted (this is made for television) but some characters are great in just how hammy they are. Bronson Pinchot is enjoyable in how over the top he is and I did enjoy Stockwell’s mystery author. He was the only one who seemed to know what he was doing. A lot of the others felt like they didn’t really know what they were doing.

The Langoliers – The Langoliers are a joke. Special effects of this era in television weren’t good and these creatures are a shining example of it. They clearly look like bad CGI and they aren’t scary in the slightest. The thing is this could have been easily avoided, we should have never seen these things or not had them at all. Time become erased as it comes to the present is a scary enough concept as is without adding badly done teeth monsters. When they popped up on screen I burst out laughing….that’s how bad they look and how all the tension and build up was immediately canceled out.

This was a film that could have been good if it hadn’t shown the Langoliers (or gotten rid of them all together) and with some better casting and writing decisions could have even been a great mini-series. Sadly this is not the reality we are in and it was the length, performances and finally the Langoliers that made this film merely okay. I’m not ready to write it off as I did enjoy the idea and Bronson’s over the top performance coupled with Stockwell’s exploration of unraveling the premise was enjoyable. So I didn’t hate this film, though there is so much that doesn’t work. If you like Stephen King and his works, this is worth checking out for how he explores time but besides that…you have to really enjoy King to get enjoyment from this work. I understand the infamy of this film, even if I don’t share the hate.

Final Score: 6.5 / 10 Not good, but fun.

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Colossal (2017): An Amazing Exploration of Monsters as Metaphor

     “Colossal” is an amazing film. This is a film that has giant monsters, explores ideas of addiction and abuse through use of the monsters and has a great script and actors to go along with it. Hathaway is empathetic but also monstrous at times and Sudeikis’s Oscar is this constant threat through the film that lends power to the narrative.  All this is explored masterfully by Sedakis and Hathaway and Vigalondo’s script is so tight that it flows from scene to scene in exploring each scene and never feels bogged down with McCeary’s music to help better express these themes. I’m a fan of Monster and Kaiju films and this is my favorite type of these films since “Pacific Rim.”

     The film was directed and written by Nacho Vigalondo and produced by Nicolas Chartier, Zev Foreman, Dominac Rustam, Nahikari Ipiña and Shawn Williamson.

      The story involves Gloria (Anne Hathaway) getting kicked out of her boyfriend’s apartment in New York after her life of drinking and joblessness has come to a breaking point. Having nowhere to go she returns to her childhood home where her childhood friend Oscar (Jason Sudeikis) gets her a job at his bar. She soon realizes that the recent monster attacks in Seoul are from her as everytime she enters a playground the monster appears. From here she must deal with the consequences of becoming the monster while facing addiction and abuse.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros: The Premise – The premise is powerful as the idea of someone controlling a monster when they enter a certain area is really neat as it allows for human psyche to be explored. The monster works as metaphor and lends power to the themes of addiction, abuse and going from selfish to selfless.

An Exploration of Abuse and Recovery – The main arc is Gloria getting over her alcohol addiction when she’s kicked out of her apartment in NY and returns to her childhood home where she reconnects with a childhood friend who starts gas-lighting her (as he does his other friends). It comes to a head when she realizes that in the park she becomes a monster and begins getting her life back on track when she realizes her drinking and walking through the park is killing people. As she realizes how toxic her boss is she tries to leave but he finds that he becomes a giant robot in South Korea so begins destroying Seoul or threatening too if she leaves the town. At this point she’s over her addiction and now it it getting rid of an abuser which she does by leaving to South Korea and in doing her Monster appears in the small town and throws him away, ending his threat and in turn she finally has freedom as she has cut out the addiction and stopped the abuse.

 Okay: The Location of the Monsters – Narratively it honestly would have made more sense for the Monsters to be fighting in NY since that is where Gloria leaves from when she is causing a lot of damage to those around her when she leaves. Because the location is South Korea we don’t get the perspectives of any of the South Koreans unlike traditional Kaiju movies where the people in the location are the ones who drive the plot and story. It was still okay as her going to South Korea was powerful and underspoken, no one knew she was the Monster so to the people of it was very much it’s own thing (she never gets credit for being the monster outside of her small friend group), a being in and of itself not being controlled but acting as a protector. If she’d been Korean it would have made more sense that the Monster was located there…instead her only connection is a school project to honor South Korea where her and Oscar get their powers. Again, it wasn’t bad but it still could have been better. She’s from NY so put the Monsters in NY or have her be Korean so we can get the perspective of the people there outside of news reports…and so it makes what is happening even more personal.

     As I said before, this is the best monster film I’ve watched since “Pacific Rim.” This is a film that is intelligent, explores big ideas and has really rich and flawed characters. The villain feels like a threat and someone you’d meet in real life and even my one issue with film is more of a nitpick, which really comes with being a critic. Go and check this film out if you have the chance. I saw it at Salem Cinema, the indie art house in my town, so that is probably your best bet for catching it…though if it becomes popular it will no doubt get the wider release it deserves. I highly recommend this film and hope we see more smart films like this in the future as this is easily one of my favorite films to come out this year.

Final Score: 9.7 / 10

“Elementary” Pilot – Season 1, Episode 1 – “Pilot” – Addiction, Loss and Joan Watson’s Agency

Pilot Elementary

    CBS did a good job when they created “Elementary.” The only way it is in any way like BBC’s “Sherlock” is the fact that it takes place in the present…everything else is different. From Watson having agency and actually facing her past and helping Sherlock deal with his addiction, to us being given a show that tries to have individual mysteries that stand on their own. There is no arc as of the pilot, no villain is established…(unlike Moriarty established at the end of “Sherlock’s” Pilot and we see that the main people our characters are facing are one another and themselves. This is what truly makes it great.

    The “Pilot” was directed by Michael Cuesta and written by Robert Doherty.

      The story involves Joan Watson being assigned as the sober companion to Sherlock Holmes, per his father. Together they must deal with another and reach an understanding while solving a home invasion and disappearance.

The Pros: The Writing – The writing is awesome! Actions have consequences and we see Watson and Sherlock change over the course of the episode as they face issues within themselves and how they relate to one another.

The Soundtrack – Sean Callery created a beautiful soundtrack that captures the mystery of the show and also the stress of Holmes’s addiction. It’s a wonderful score and one I plan to use for writing later.

The Cinematography – The cinematography is amazing, just like in “Sherlock.” We get slow shots of action that show objects breaking as well as glimpses of scenes giving us a picture that is slowly put together over the course of the episode.

The Characters – Whether they are minor characters or major, all the characters in the pilot feel fleshed out.

Dr. Richard Mantlo – This guy is a great antagonist! He manipulates one his patients who has a sociopathic desire to kill red headed women and makes his wife change to fit the type…all of this so he can keep the money from the fortune. The man is just as disconnected as Sherlock which leads to a great contrast in how they relate to and treat others where Mantlo doesn’t care and Sherlock makes an effort.

Captain Thomas Gregson – Gregson is the American detective who helps them with the case and brings Holmes in as a consulting detective. He is a source of stability for both Joan and Sherlock as he is always laid back and is a calming present for both their anxieties. Aidan Quinn does a great job.

Joan Watson – Lucy Liu owns this role! In her we see that she is working through trauma too as she failed as a surgeon and that is what lead her to become a sober companion. Unlike other Watson’s she does’t put up with Holmes’s abuse and calls him out or leaves him which forces him to grow and change how he interacts with people so he doesn’t take them for granted. Holmes also helps her find confidence as she helps him solve cases through their conversing and she gives empathy to others that he only really gives to her.

Sherlock Holmes – Jonny Lee Miller plays a very intense Holmes. His Holmes took addiction to the fullest and is recovering from that. This makes him intense and rebellious (a very different but fun take) and leads to him having to relate to people as he doesn’t want to be alone after how he was burned in the past. To this end we see him learn to talk to others, specifically Joan Watson who he grows to respect over the course of the episode.

    This is a show that really did everything right. It took the essence of the source material and grew beyond it…it also remembered the core art of writing and the fact that actions have consequences and characters must change. There is no real problem with this episode but there is a greater problem I had with the series…after the Finale I tried watching Season 2 but I couldn’t get into the disconnected format, the lack of arc and with it the eventual filler that came is what turned me off from the show. In the future I will give the show a full watch and assessment, but for now I stopped watching it for a reason and I have no idea if Season 3 was able to become more solid and do less side quests.

Final Score: 9.5 / 10. Only reason it isn’t higher is because it’s not really attached to the rest of the show, showing this series would have worked better as a mini-series not a 24 episode format.