What We Left Behind – Looking Back on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (2019) – The Perfect “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” Documentary

  “Deep Space Nine” is my favorite of the “Star Trek Series.” This is a series that was willing to explore philosophy, religion war and give the minor characters full arcs. It is no wonder Ronald Moore created the rebooted “Battlestar Galactica” from this show, which is also one of my favorite sci. fi. shows. He was on the writing team while Ira Steven Behr was the showrunner. This is easily the best documentary I’ve ever watched. It has comedy, heart, philosophy, depth and explores the relationships and characters who made up the show. My bias being that “Deep Space Nine” is my favorite of the “Star Trek Franchise” and in Sci. fi. shows as a whole. It certainly has flaws and wasn’t perfect and this is a documentary that honestly explores that.

The documentary was directed by Ira Steven Behr and David Zappone, produced by 455 Films and released by Shout! Studios.

The documentary traces the origins of “Deep Space Nine’s” creation, the actors and their thoughts on the show, gives us a hypothetical new season with many of the original writing team and explores the legacy the show left behind.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Into and Ending – The Into and ending were so corny and perfect. “Deep Space Nine” had Vic Fontaine’s Jazz lounge as a major part of the show and the Documentary paid tribute to that by having Max Grodénchik (Rom) kick it off with a corny song about leaving his heart on “Deep Space Nine.” In the end he is joined by Jeffrey Combs (Grunt and Weyoun on Ds9), Casey Biggs (Damar) and Armin Shimermen (Quark) to finish the song. It had so much heart, even if the lyrics don’t always work. The four of them are also great singers.

The Reaction to the Show – Throughout the documentary the cast reads fans letters as Ira Steven Behr interviews them. These are glimpses of history that show just how much the show was hated by some in it’s initial release. People hated that the show was darker and that it wasn’t daily exploration on a ship. The reactions are nuanced (Ira on making sense of how people saw it as a dark show) to funny when Aron Eisenberg (Nog) reads a reaction from someone who hated it. This was one of the aspects that added character to the documentary.

The Making of the Show – Making the show an episodic story beyond single bottle episodes or two-parters was revolutionary. This was a major part of the film, and beyond that how when most fans talked about the show in interviews it was largely about the Dominion War arc. It was the arc that changed everything outside of the arcs of “Babylon 5.” We also got to see the Writers Room when Behr got together with Ronald Moore and some of the other writers from the show to draft a pilot for a new season. It was really neat seeing that as well as the relationship between the showrunner, directors, actors and crew. They also went into the Evolution of the Dominion and how they evolved into a collection of species versus a single one.

The Actors’ Stories – Part of what makes the story so compelling are getting the stories of the actors and the relationships formed over the course of the show. We learn about how Armin Shimerman (Quark) used to host the other actors who played Ferengi at his home to go over the scripts. “Deep Space Nine” was full of Ferengi episodes and seeing how friendships grew out of it was so wonderful. We also got to see that Alaimo (Dukat) had a crush on Nana Visitor (Kira), and Avery Brooks (Captain Sisko) and how to this day he is friends and mentor to his show son Cirroc Lofton. The actors also talked about their characters and created interludes. Andrew Robinson (Garak) appeared early on and later to talk about how when he first played the character he played him as wanting to have sex with Doctor Bashir and how the character relationships evolved into a deep friendship. It was awesome hearing that first hand as Robinson always played Garak as Bisexual and him voicing that made me happy.  They also touched on Terry Farrell (Jadzia Dax) leaving the show and the disrespect from the directors as well as when Nicole de Boar (Ezri) took over for the last season of the show. Even with all that happened there are still so many friendships among the cast.

Taking Responsibility and Impact in Social Justice – This was a show that tackled the themes of poverty, race, war, philosophy and Behr took responsibility the fact that they didn’t explore gender and sexuality very well. They recognized the existence sexuality and LGTBTQ rights but didn’t advocate. Behr owned it and it made me respect him a lot. “Star Trek” has always been a progressive show and it has dropped the ball on LGBTQ justice all of this time until “Discovery” really.

The New Season Pilot – One of the arcs through the documentary getting what writers he could together to write a new season of the snow. The new season pilot is awesome. It starts with Captain Nog being attacked and a reunion of all the characters returning to “Deep Space Nine.” Kira is a priestess and the station is a religious site, Worf is in line to takeover after Martok to rule the Empire, Julian Bashir is a captain with Ezri serving together on a ship and O’Brien is a professor at Starfleet academy while Jake is a successful author. From here things unfold as it starts out with Nog being attacked by an unscene show before arriving at the station. From we learn of a Bajor / Jem’Hadar plot that Kira is tied to and the return of Sisko as he reaches out to his children. I would watch it and I wish it would get made. Sadly I doubt it will exist beyond the fandom of this documentary though.

What You’ll Get on the DVD – The documentary ended with Nana Visitor talking to Behr about everything that wasn’t covered. Whether it was her failed marriage to Alexander Siddig (Julian Bashir), her having a baby and how they wrote that into the show, “In the Pale Moonlight” and quite a few other things. Behr said they’d all be on the special features of the dvd and that it was cut for time. Hearing that lead me to pre-order the dvd. I can’t wait to see all of the things that didn’t make it and rewatch this perfect documentary again.

If it wasn’t obvious already, “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” is one of my favorite shows of all time. This was the “Star Trek series” I felt was good to great all the way through and explored the themes I love in stories. It gave politics, philosophy, war, identity and history all in deep and respectful ways. If you are a sci. fi. fan I highly recommend this show. This show started so much and any time I have the chance to see these actors and writers if they end up in Portland at a Comic Con, you bet I’ll be there. This was a show funded by the fans and created for them and the time and love put into it made it the perfect documentary and film. I’ll be surprised if any film compares when this year is done.

10 / 10. “Deep Space Nine” is one of my favorite Science Fiction shows of all time and I can’t think of a better way to honor it. The actors in this cast are folks I’d go to comic con for if they make it over my way.

Top 5 Episodes in “Love, Death & Robots” Season 1

انمي Love Death and Robots الموسم 1 مترجم الحلقة 13 - هلال ...

     “Love, Death & Robots” is an amazing Sci. Fi. Anthology show on Netflix. It is original and the basic concept is original and adapted science fiction short stories are done by different animators and often times adapted from stories from known sci. fi. writers. It is a beautiful anthology and tackles a lot of the popular concepts of time, personhood, self, identity, meaning, etc. that the best sci. fi. stories cover. The series overall is great, with 18 total episodes. There were some okay and good episodes too, which was why I chose this format. The great stories stand out and are the ones I want to talk about. If you are a fan of science fiction and fantasy or great animation, this is a Netflix original show, well worth your time.

The series was created by Tim Miller, with himself, Joshua Doden, David Fincher and Jennifer Miller as producers.

In my episode reviews I will attributing the author who inspired each story if there is one. This is partially because I want to go back and read the stories, especially since I know some of these folks from other works and want to give them credit for inspiring such an amazing show. I also won’t be giving scores this time around. Each of these stories are worlds I’d like to return to, and I feel like I can’t judge a short story in this case, the way I’d judge a movie or a full episode of a show. I also can’t wait to read them.

SPOILERS ahead. I’ll try not to give away too much, but sometimes I will have to mention what makes the story work, which in short stories is often the reveal, which is what these are.

Don't miss these six 'Love, Death, & Robots' shorts

5th) “Good Hunting”

Episode 8, based on story by Ken Liu.

“Good Hunting” is a sad, beautiful and intriguing story that also has a sense of justice in the end. It takes place in an alternate universe where Britain conquers and turns China into a steampunk Colony. The animation is like a painting or a classic anime and I wanted to be more in this world, simply from the animation alone. It really sets the scene of China, really well. Before all this the main story involves a boy who hunts shapeshifters with his father and saves the daughter of the shapeshifter his father is hunting. They become friends and he becomes an engineer and she becomes a prostitute in the conquered China under British Rule. Both of them experience change in who they are and they talk about it together. They weren’t who they were as kids and colonization has changed not just the country but each of them. It has built the son up in regards to his engineering even though he is broken and she is torn apart. Thankfully justice happens, but so much pain happens inbetween. This is a sorrowful story, where the only bright light is the friendship between the son and the shapeshifter’s daughter. I loved it though, this story has things to stay against Imperialism, sexism and the nature of self. I can’t wait to read more of Ken Liu’s work as I loved his translation of the novel “The Three Body Problem,” by Liu Cixin. This story has that same kind of depth, which is why it made my Top 5 of the season, beyond the tragic compelling characters.

Love, Death And Robots: The Witness: Ending Explained ...

4th) “The Witness”

Episode 3, written by Alberto Mielgo.

“The Witness” was written by it’s director Alberto Mielgo and this was a story that grew on me the more I thought about it. The basic premise is two individuals caught in a time loop. Whenever one kills the other, the cycle starts over again. The dreamlike nature portrayed in the colors in the art contributes to the experience. This feels like the mixture between reality and a dream, which contributes to the point of the story. It is hard to talk about it without spoiling it because the whole premise is what makes it compelling beyond the “Blade Runner” inspired world. I could have easily spent more time here. We never get to know the characters beyond the desperation, but they are characters born out of their environment. The constant rush and tension is illustrated in the events that happen in the loop and it was impossible to pull away. I’d really like to see what else Mielgo is capable of writing. This was a great start and his world is full of untapped potential for future tales.

3rd) “Beyond the Aquila Rift”

Episode 7, based on story by Alastair Reynolds.

“Beyond the Aquila Rift” was a story that almost scored lower because it repeats a song it plays in the middle of the episode. This made it feel like a musical to me, but the basic premise won in the end, especially when coupled with the almost real animation. What does it mean for an alien to care for another completely alien to it? This basic premise defines the relationship between our protagonist and the form the alien takes as a past lover to relate to him and to give him happiness, as he is in a place he cannot return from. What sold it for me, beyond this basic premise is how the reality of where he is looks like a hellscape. The tone here completely changes and suddenly the aliens good intentions don’t feel so benign, especially since one of the crew members once awakened sees past the illusion of her form. We never know her or it’s intentions though. That is why this works so well. He could be in bliss as she feeds off him to trap more people (she also looks like a spider in her true form, which adds to this) but they might have really gotten lost and truly can’t back, in which case it is giving empathy and caring in the only way it knows how and it easing suffering. This complexity is truly why this story works in the end.

Spoiler Free Review of ‘Love, Death, and Robots: Sonnies ...

2nd) “Sonnie’s Edge”

Episode 1, based on story by Peter F. Hamilton.

“Sonnie’s Edge” is a story that is all about the twist, but it is a really good one. This takes place in a world where humans control monsters to fight each other and from it win money and fame. When Sonnie is asked to throw the game, she refuses leading to them targeting her. In the end they succeed when she takes a liking to the lover of the man who wants them to throw the game. What they don’t realize is (and I’m not sure if her crew know it or not, since we are never shown) is that Sonnie is really the monster. She is the beast in the pits always fighting for her life and the human is just her robot avatar. For me the questions that it sparked were the intelligence of the monsters (given she manipulated things to win in the end) and what that means for others like her. A lot could happen in this world, especially since at least her species is capable of controlling A.I. and making friends with humans. All this leads to her getting revenge against the people who wanted to kill her (they kill her robot avatar) and her implied escape. It is beautifully done and the reveal is perfect. The designs of the monsters are also worth commenting on. They look like Kaiju from “Pacific Rim” and it gives them a distinct character and threat.

Love, Death & Robots Episode 14: Zima Blue Ending ...

1st) “Zima Blue”

Episode 14, based on story by Alastair Reynolds.

What is the purpose of life? What is meaning? This is the core question that this story asks as we learn about Zima through the eyes of a journalist. It is in this episode he tells his story as we learn he was once an early A.I. who ever countless years developed intelligence leading to him becoming the greatest artist in the world. it is fascinating how the reveal happens as the A.I. is risking everything for purpose and meaning. The final twist is a gut punch in that it wants to return to it’s original purpose in the end. The original robot was made for cleaning a pool and the symbol of the blue that kept popping up in the complex art of the universe was this robot only find peace in the simple desire to clean the pool and tiles to look like that color. As someone who loves philosophy and finds the importance of living to be a prime question, this episode is sci. fi. at it’s best. It takes that question beyond survival, love or horror (which many of the stories have above) and breaking it down to it’s base parts. Which in this instance is an immortal person with so much knowledge, returning to the basic knowledge of cleaning a pool. It is profound and it supposed to make you question. Beyond that the art is like Zima’s paintings and and fits the narrative so well. I’m looking forward to checking out Reynolds’s work. He is on this list twice and this story is truly a magnum opus.

I’m going to say it one last time. If you are a sci. fi. fan, check out “Love, Death & Robots.” It is easily one of the best things on Netflix right now and I really hope it gets renewed, so we can see more stories brought to life.

“The Orville” Season 1 – A Show That Draws Inspiration From the Best Aspects of “Star Trek”

    “The Orville” is a show that only exists because of how much of a fan Seth MacFarlane is of “Star Trek” and Fox knowing just how great the cultural impact of “Star Trek” has been that a show that pulls full inspiration from it (while having it’s own tone and lore) and not get sued. What do I think of the show? I think the humor doesn’t always work but I love the drama and the characters. Seth MacFarlane put a lot of love into this show and it was perfectly cast in regards to the characters and their roles…and I can’t wait to see where the show is taken next.

The story involves Ed Mercer being given the chance to Captain the Planetary Union ship known as the U.S.S. Orville. He soon learns his ex-wife Commander Kelly Grayson will be his First Officer as they must sort out their issues as the new crew faces the drama of one another and the wider Universe the Planetary Union inhabits in the 25th Century. 

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros: The Universe – The Universe is a lot like “Star Trek” but a bit similar to our reality in that rather than the vague spirituality of Trek, everyone in the future is an atheist if they are part of the Planetary Union or any future person. There are countless aliens, most are humanoid (like “Star Trek”) but the Union is strong but not the strongest. The highly religious and zealotesque Krill are and they are a fantastic enemy in the episodes they come up in. Most of the episodes are solving dilemmas though, whether it is finding ancient ships and a civ. on board, interacting with a bronze age people that advances rapidly, or passing into 2D space. Like “Star Trek” this is a universe rich with possibilities.

The Crew of “The Orville” – The crew is overall amazing. I’m giving certain characters special treatment though, because they stood out to me and will mention some other notable things in this summary. The characters are complicated, you have Doctor Claire Finn who is woman who chose single motherhood because she wanted to be a mom and could have kids without needs a spouse or partner, you have Lt. Commander LaMarr who hid his intelligence because in the colony he came from it was looked down upon, but in turn becomes the Chief Engineer on the ship, you have Bortus who fights for the right of his child to choose his own gender in a species that has only males and a few others who I will go into deeper into the review of the show. The least notable is Lt. Gordon Malloy who is comedic and good at being a pilot and that is the extent. He isn’t complicated.

Alara – Alara is one of my favorite characters. She is the security officer on the ship and comes from a planet where her gravity is heavier so her species is stronger than most. We learn they also as a culture look down on military and similar professions as they see it as below their intellect. She went against her parents to join the Planetary Alliance and because of it holds herself to an impossible standard, and we see it when in an episode she faces her worst fears and the worst fears of her crew members and succeeds. It is a powerful episode and reaffirmed why she is one of my favorite characters on the show.

Isaac – Isaac is from a race of artificial non-biological beings who believe themselves to be the most superior life forms in the galaxy. Isaac joined in order to learn about humankind, and is our Data stand in. His arc is him learning how to care for humans and organics beyond just studying them and it is handled really well. I can’t wait to see where his arc goes.

Captain Mercer and Commander Grayson – The main arc that drives the story is the relationship between Captain Mercer and Commander Grayson. They are divorced after Grayson cheated on Mercer with a blue alien. We later learn the alien can make anyone fall in love with him when it is going through mating and that might have been what happened. There are a few false starts and with each friendship grows between them but Grayson cuts it off in the finale when she realizes that their love is causing Mercer to do things he wouldn’t have usually done as a Captain that put him and others at risk so they cut it off. It is touching and the arc is fun.

The Secular Future – The future is won by science and I loved it. This is a future where humanity has myths still but they mostly come from television shows and past knowledge, as far as we know there isn’t supernatural and there is no religion to speak of beyond the Krill or less advanced species and it usually comes up as a problem. Seth MacFarlane wrote this and it shows, and for what its worth as a secular agnostic humanist, I enjoyed this future greatly. Like “Star Trek” it showed a world not defined by religion but by even deeper ideas of self.

Exploring Dilemmas – One of the great things about “Star Trek” that “The Orville” does well is the exploration of moral dilemmas. Be they dilemmas of culture and technology (justice by “likes” and “dislikes”) the agency of a person within in a nation in regards to their family (an all male species forcing a newborn born female to be turned male and her choice being taken away, and this species if a major player in the Planetary Union) why there are rules for first contact (Kelly sets off a religion on a planet that exists orbiting through universes when she heals a little girl with her technology)  and countless other dilemmas where crew-members have to make choices where there isn’t always a clear answer.

Okay: The Humor – The humor is good at times but falls short on others when it has characters like Lt. Gordon going on away missions, when all he does is jokes, or Lt. LaMarr grinding on a statue on an alien society and no one on the crew being briefed on how the culture they were down studying worked as they searched for scientists who had gone missing…The humor made these stories that were largely solidly written otherwise, to go down in quality. Cheap laughs are not the way to go. When the show nails it, it is amazing, but it wasn’t consistent.

The Series Arc / The Episodic Nature of the Show – The show is largely episodic with the only consistent arc being Ed and Kelly working through what their relationship is now. I would have preferred more of an arc with the Krill, they do still a giant Krill warship in the last episode the Krill are in but it doesn’t go anywhere after that. That was missed potential that made the show not really get the great exit it deserved, since it really did have a great entrance. Solidly good show, but not great.

This is a show that if you are a fan of sci. fi., “Star Trek” or Seth MacFarlane, you will probably enjoy. This is easily the best thing he’s ever done by miles and I’m glad the show was renewed for another season. Where he chooses to take the show remains to be seen, as it could remain like TNG and TOS and largely remain episodic with some powerful episodes along the way, or it could go the way of DS9 and later ENT and give us some powerful arcs that payoff on a personal and galactic scale. I’m all for finding a good medium inbetween as well, arc episodes and bottle episodes together. As someone whose missed “Star Trek” since it went off the air and all we had were movies, this and “Discovery” made this Trekkie happy. If you like “Star Trek,” you should at least give this show a chance.

Final Score: 8.5 / 10. Humor often time hurt the drama and lack of an overall arc kept the season from greatness.