Constantine (2005): A Decent Adaptation Buried Under Weird Pacing and Stilted Dialogue

Constantine

       “Constantine” is one of those strange films that doesn’t quite work. There are some great moments in it, especially when it felt like the amazing character Constantine was there (Keanu Reeves managed to pull it off when he was given good dialogue), but the weird pacing, clash of tones and overall stilted dialogue keep this film from ever reaching good. Constantine is a fascinating character who is driven by outsmarting the greater powers than himself, he’s a deal maker and cynic and I wish we could have seen more of that, as well as the personal nature of most of the stories in the “Hellblazer” series where his story is told.

     The film was directed by Francis Lawrence, written by Kevin Brodin and Frank Cappello and produced by Akiva Goldsman, Lorenzo di Bonaventura, Michael Uslan, Benjamin Melniker and Lauren Shuler Donner.

     The story involves Constantine (Keanu Reeves) facing his mortality as he learns he has terminal cancer  as Detective Angela is pulled into his world after the mysterious suicide of her sister (Rachel Weisz plays both characters). As Angela discovers the magic that exists in her family forces plot against the world as Constantine and his allies must work to save it and prevent the end.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros: The World – The world is one of the best parts of this film! There are half-demons and half-angels, and it takes place on the world stage in a world full of broken people. There are not heroes in this and that is part of what it makes it so fun.

Cinematography – The CGI is a little dated but the style of it is still amazing. I loved how Hell was done and how they presented seeing things that are hidden from us in our world. Philippe Rousselot did a great job.

Introduction to Constantine – We are introduced to Constantine as he kicks a warrior demon out of a girl. His interactions with the people and the demon is straight up Constantine. He’s standoffish, business all the way through and after takes out. Even his friends  give him space.

Hell – Hell is a twisted version of our world above and further below you have people consuming and being consumed. It was a very creative take on Hell and added terror to the demons we met.

Luficer – This Luficer is the threatening salesman and it works. He has power to how he speaks, with an heir of threatening kindness. I liked the white suit and the detail of him leaving behind black wherever he walked was great at giving him an otherworldly feel. He ends up punishing his son for breaking out and dealing with the half-angel Gabriel to try and take over and nearly takes Constantine until God protects him when he offers his life for Angela’s sister.

Chas Kramer – Shia LeBeouf was so much more likeable before “Transformers” and his later stuff. In this he’s Constantine’s driver and shows that he’s been studying up on how to fight demons too in the final fight, even though he does die he gets a lot of humanity and shows he isn’t just a fan, he wants to be respected.

Papa Midnite – This character is cold and cruel and after is chill and acts like an old friend again with Constantine. I like both versions of the character and just wish he’d been written more consistently. Djimon Hounsou does a fantastic job.

Constantine – Keanu can act when given the chance and he shows it here. We see him mad, sad, empathetic and all the emotions of a man dealing with death. His character also gets an arc too as his friends all die to Gabriel and Mammon but God protects him in the end when he finds belief and stops smoking since he got 2 chances as he kills himself twice over the course of the film (first to end the torture his parents were putting him through, second for the meeting with Luficer).

Okay: Constantine’s Arc – the arc was too easy, he is a cynical guy who knows that there are tons of higher beings out there but knows they can’t be counted on (even God drops the ball on letting his friends die and all the people who died from the fallout of Mammon and Gabriel getting their plans together) so him becoming a sudden believer made sense in the simplest of arcs but didn’t feel quite true to the character…so putting it at okay.

The Cons: Angela Dodson – Rachel Weisz is usually always the damsel and she is here too. She learns how to have psychic powers and is used by the villains almost immediately. It’s annoying and I hated that her character only seemed to exist in this role.

The Dialogue – The dialogue is stilted and sometimes characters will make comments that are meant to be jokes but it just ruins the tone of the scene and makes the pacing feel choppy.

Tone – The tone is thankfully largely dark but the moments of attempted humor don’t always work when they try go light hearted, I almost think this was meant to be a PG-13 movie but because they went for the R it just made the tone jarring.

Pacing – Thanks to tone and dialogue the pacing doesn’t flow all the time. The pacing of the opening and middle are fine but right around the end and leading up to the climax there are scenes that linger and it ruins the pacing.

    This is a film that is worth seeing once or renting and that is it. The great moments where Constantine is the cynical anti-hero of the comics make this film a lot of fun, and Keanu has more range than he is given credit…I think he suffers from having films with bad scripts or off tones, as this film does, but he is still a positive of this film. There were moments he felt like the Constantine in the comics, even though Constantine finding God and quitting smoking felt out of character, in all the “Hellblazer” comics I’ve read, nothing close to that happens. He makes deals and cons higher powers, he doesn’t give them worship. Still, I get why they did the arc, Constantine’s growth when it happens is hard write, so these writers took the easy way to write growth rather than writing something more complex, but given that they wrote the dialogue, the story is going to be brought down regardless. Rent it if you like Constantine, DC and Vertigo comics and films or like Keanu Reeves, but don’t go in expecting a good film.

Final Score: 7 / 10

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“Supernatural” Season 11 – Reminds Us Why We’re Here for the Characters and Chokes at the End

Supernatural Season 11

    Well, I came back to the show. I didn’t watch the non-myth arc episodes unless a friend recommended a certain one, but I came back…and the show got better! The ending still kind of sucked, but the overall story improved a lot! This was the season that payed off on the relationships that have been building up for so long and seeing how those relationships unfolded really lended power to the choices and consequences that happened leading up to the Finale.

      I wish the show had been canceled this season though, so much of what was bad about the Finale could have been avoided if they’d just tied the story together at the end as the Winchesters and their allies live on after their greatest battle..if only we’d been so lucky. Last season was terrible, and here are some of my thoughts on it:https://cameronmoviesandtv.wordpress.com/2015/05/25/supernatural-season-10-retrospect-terrible-writing-pointless-deaths-dropped-arcs-and-codependency-continues/

But this season managed to fix some of those things, and avoiding the “Monster of the Week” episodes made the overall experience better.

    The showrunner for this season was Jeremy Carver, and he actually managed to capture a lot of what made the Lucifer/Apocalypse Arc back during the first 5 seasons (after how bad last season was I wasn’t expecting this).

SPOILERS

    The story involves the Winchesters trying to stop The Darkness after they release into the world after last season when Dean killed Death and the Mark was destroyed. From here they will free Lucifer, find God and create an Alliance to stop the ending of everything.

The Pros: The World – The world of “Supernatural” is fascinating, and we actually get some questions answered as to the nature of the world in this season. Seriously, for a lot of this season it feels like it is trying to everything that went wrong last season.

Metatron – Metatron’s back and actually has a redemption arc! We see Cas about to kill when he’s filming people he’s killing to make money on the street, but when God finds him to write his Memoirs there is a turn around and we see Cas’s mercy actually helped him to grow. In the end he stands against the Darkness/Amara and dies for it.

“Safe House,” The Bobby Episode – More Bobby is great and I like that he was helping the boys through his journal not physically being there. It was tactfully done and showed the cost of being a hunter.

Team Free Will – Team Free Will is the best it has been and now Crowley and Rowina are kind of part of the Team too, as well as Chuck/God (yep, he’s God). They finally take these arcs somewhere interesting.

Castiel – Castiel is the sacrificial lamb this season and becomes Lucifer’s vessel to defeat the Darkness. He is an outsider from Heaven and is full ally of humanity at this point. Misha continues to own this role and his performance as Lucifer is fantastic.

Lucifer – Lucifer possesses Cas to defeat the Darkness and we get to see him try and kill the brothers and eventually resolve things with God as they both resolve how selfish and flawed they both are. He also keeps fighting the Darkness until she kicks him out of Cas and possibly killed him. Misha’s performance here is brilliant.

Dean  – Jensen Ackles continues to be the charisma of this show in regards to why the Winchestsers are still main characters. Here we see him become more of a mentor to countless characters and even help the Darkness and God resolve their issues. This is a character who is tough with a lot of empathy and this season really illustrates that.

Sam – Jared Padalecki does alright. He still doesn’t feel all that different from all his past seasons…but at least he’s given more to do this season. Sam feels like his role has been taken over by Cas and the only way to counter that is to have Cas possessed by Lucifer, so props to the writers for getting that right. He isn’t memorable per usual, but I liked that he at least didn’t bring the show down.

Allies – Rowina and the Witches and Crowley and his demons become allies at one point! This I thought was handled pretty well as we see Crowley getting human blood really did change him a lot and Rowina’s motivation for helping makes sense. The treading water with these folks last season actually goes somewhere.

Rowina – Rowina like Crowley allies with Lucifer and is nearly killed…allies with the Darkness…same thing and finally gets that she needs people who care about her a little and resolves things with Crowley and even makes friends with God in relating to being a parent.

Crowley – Mark Sheppard is one of my favorite actors and he owns the role of the King of Hell. In this he loses it when Lucifer comes back but escapes and later becomes an official part of Team Free Will when he realizes his minions don’t respect him for his humanity and that he is the outsider, just like them. He is Neutral at this point, with leanings to good and it lends power to his role. He ends up embracing that when he can’t win on his terms as the Darkness doesn’t owe him anything and he values having something whether it is respect for relationship. Crowely continues to be one of the best part of this show.

Chuck/God – Chuck is God and how they do it is really cool…what if God were humanesque but alien? The show tackles that as he learns to see the details in the big picture and his overall good intent is explored to the fullest as he seeks out to resolve thing with Amara/The Darkness after she tries to kill him. This reveal was handled amazingly and I like that they made this writing choice.

The Darkness/Amara – I’m glad that the Darkness has a personality. This is a character who I expected to hate after last season but whose performance manages to actually matter thanks to Emily Swallow. You get why she hates what God did, given he imprisoned her forever…Her arc is resolving this as we see at the end of the day she is in everyone, not just Dean which there is romantic tension due to him having the Mark. I got her choices and changes and really , this is where the show had ended. There is nowhere to go after this that doesn’t feel like a cheap encore.

Okay/Con: The Ending – Everything with Amara, Rowina and Crowley, the brothers, Castiel, Heaven and Lucifer…and Chuck is great…but it keeps pulling away from that to set up next season with the London Chapter of the Men of Letters. 

The Cons: The London Chapter of “The Men of Letters”  –  These guys ruin the drama going on between Rowina, Crowley, Lucifer, Castiel, Chuck/God, The Darkness/Amara and the brothers. This only exists because they got renewed and just hurts the plot that I would have at least put at an 8 if not for this crap.

Happy Ending When Show Isn’t Done – The show should have been done…you defeat the thing that was around before God and make it care about what God made. This could have been much more emotionally powerful if it had just been the end, but it wasn’t. London Chapter comes out of nowhere to prosecute the boys and shoot Sam and Dean finds Sam and Dean’s mom…What the hell?

  As you can see there are a lot more pros this season than last season, which felt like it was largely treading water. I think that they were getting ready to end the show but when they were green lit for another season they knew they needed something to keep the cash coming, and it cost them good story in the process, and gave us a Finale that was good when it wasn’t setting up next season.

Final Score: 7 / 10

The X-Files – Season 10, Episode 5 – “Babylon” – The Power of Words

The X Files Babylon

     This was easily the worst episode of “The X-Files” mini-series so far. The tone is all over the place and it doesn’t give any of the ideas proper space and time to develop and grow so remains a disconnected and disjointed mess. This is an episode that if it had chosen to focus on one of the big ideas it would have been great, but instead tried to to do much and failed.

     “Babylon” was directed and written by Chris Carter.

      The story involves Mulder and Scully investigating an area after a terror attack as they try to communicate with one of the terrorists who survived the bombing, even though he is in a coma. They are working with their younger counterparts as well with Agent Einstein in the Scully role and Agent Miller in the Mulder role.

The Pros: The Idea – The idea of investigating the afterlife or the idea and concept of God and belief is fascinating and could have worked with a tighter script, a smaller cast and a rewrite. I still like the ideas they wanted to explore.

Dana Scully – Scully is great in this as we see her working with Miller to find where the terrorist cell is. She is also the calm and collected to Mulder and after Mulder get’s high she’s there for him to bring him back down.

Fox Mulder – Mulder is just crazy this episode, and because it’s Mulder it works. It still one of the weakest ways he’s been written though. His hallucinating The Cigarette Smoking Man in the afterlife was just weird.

Skinner – Skinner appears briefly in this to reprimand Mulder…I wish we had gotten more time with him as anytime he’s around there is a great dynamic. I’m glad he survived the series thus far.

The Cons: The New Agents – They don’t really work as they feel like cutouts of Mulder and Scully while missing the fact that Mulder and Scully were actually fully developed characters.

God and Religion – We never really get this explored. There are trumpets that sound and no one knows from where but they never investigate it really and it is forgotten about. If it wanted to explore these ideas it should have taken the time to do just that.

Tonal Dissidence – The episode begins with a suicide bombing, radicalization is briefly discussed and we have Mulder get high and go to a Cowboy Club before he travels to the afterlife…What the hell?

   I wouldn’t recommend this episode. It doesn’t really work in anyway and I wonder if Chris Carter was the writer who took the show off the deep end before it was canceled based off what I watched here. If you want to see high Mulder it’s probably on youtube now and that’s pretty much it as far as comedy goes in an episode that should have been serious and focused.

Final Score: 2 / 10

The Rabbi’s Cat (2011): A Critique and Bringing Together of Religions and Cultures

poster_rabbis_cat_2_med

     This review is going to be a little different from the ones I do before as it was one that my friend Matthew and I discussed doing, that each of would review a film in each other’s style. Matthew is a writer at “The 10th Man.” He’s really good and writes about a diverse range of topics, primarily focused on media. Here is the link to his website:  https://the10thman.wordpress.com/.

    He has already reviewed “The Rabbi’s Cat” in a style inspired by mine, so now I am going to do the same.

  “The Rabbi’s Cat,” was directed by Joann Sfar (who also wrote the comic, screenplay and was one of the producers) and Antoine Delesvaux and based on the comic book of the same title. It is beautiful animated (with the exception of the strange style changes at different parts that make it more cartoony) but the film largely works because of the themes it explores which are ones of how cultures and religions clash and the ways they and people can come to understandings, as well as critiquing the different religions and cultures too, through the eyes of the Rabbi’s Cat. The film also explores what it means to be an individual in a group and what makes a good person.

     We see the exploration of culture from the beginning when the Rabbi’s Cat gets the ability to speak after eating the Rabbi’s Parrot and after wants to become Jewish because it is the only way the Rabbi will let him spend time with his daughter. We see the Rabbi change though as the more extreme Rabbi once the cat killed for claiming to be God and questioning everything. Algerian Jewish culture is explored through the Rabbi as well as Russian culture through the explorer and the Russian painter and through the Sufi Sheikh we get to explore the many African cultures as they are following the painters dream to find Jerusalem, which to them is a nation of Black Jews where there is no racism and intolerance. It’s a beautiful exploration that is done and you can tell that those involved did their research on all the different groups explored in the story.

     There is also a critique of culture that we see as well. This movie is not Morally Relative, which I liked. At one point a desert tribe the Sheikh knows helps them heal the Rabbi’s cat. But things soon turn to violence as the youngest one was itching for a fight and we soon see how superior they act and feel, much like the French and in Algeria in relationship to the Jews like the Rabbi. In both cases this dehumanizing of the other leads to violence as the Russian explorer gets killed by the tribe and we see how outsiders are treated like their women. If you’re not in the group, you are out of sight and out of mind. We also see the critique of Conservative Jewish culture through the cat who uses Science to question the Torah, and through the Rabbi’s daughter, who just wants choice in her life. This narrative continues throughout the entire film.

    The third theme is that of what identity means and what it means to be a good person. I think the Sufi Sheikh sums it up best in relationship to God. “I just imagine that God is a decent person and live from that.” It is this that helps the Rabbi become comfortable in giving the African barmaid and the Russian Painter a Jewish wedding even though she doesn’t believe in God and the Russian isn’t a practicing Jew. This core decency and respect of others is how the Rabbi’s cat change too. The cat starts out as a liar but in the end is looking out for the others and is quiet when he needs to be so his friends don’t get in trouble. The cat learns empathy just like the Rabbi and together they become more like each other in realizing they don’t know who God is or what it means to be Jewish, or a talking cat, but that won’t stop them from caring for people or living a good life.

      There really is only one scene that was troubling and that was when they find the Jewish Ethiopian Kingdom and things get overly cartoony. The tribe is presented as savage giants and it becomes a whole slapstick event that clashes with everything prior. This is still a favorite film, but that whole sequence really took away from everything that had occurred up to that moment. The cat was comedic relief again, the tribesmen were presented as idiots and it’s only purpose was to show that the idealized Jerusalem would be one they would have to create for themselves. That’s a great message, but because of how it’s presented the message feels a little cheapened. If you are looking for an amazing, French, surreal, animated film with a point you should check this one out. There is far more to like in this film than not, and it is a favorite for a reason.

Final Score: 8.8 / 10.

Persepolis (2007): A Masterpiece on Revolution, Family and Identity

Persepolis Poster

“Persepolis” is one of my favorite graphic novels of all time. It captures Marjane Satrapi’s experiences of the Revolution in Iran and growing up abroad so powerfully while at the same time remaining a powerful story. The film is not as good as the graphic novel, which might have been due to time constraints, but it does captures the essence and the major arcs really well, as well as the important characters who were a part of Marjane’s life. Suffice to say, I really liked this film and will explain in more detail further down. The film itself is a French-Iranian animated film that takes inspiration and story from the Graphic Novel of the same name.

“Persepolis” was directed by Marjane Satrapi who also co-wrote the screenplay and of course the original novel. The other director was Vincent Parannaud who also co-wrote the screenplay. The producers were Xavier Rigault, Marc-Antione Robert and Kathleen Kennedy.

The story begins with an older Marjane waiting at the airport and remembering her childhood in Iran.  From here we have a flashback and see young Marjane’s childhood as the Revolution is occurring in Iran to overthrow the Shah. From here the story unfolds as her family is filled with hope and promise that soon turns to fear when the religious take over and begin instituting harsh laws. The story follows the rebellious Marjane and her story in Iran and her reasons for leaving and later returning. r

The Pros: The Premise – Marjane’s story is fascinating at it covers a country in transition (Iran during the Shah and after under the Ayatollah) and it’s from the perspective of a little girl all the way to adulthood. From this we get the experience of a new view of the west from her time in Austria and also of Iran after she returns as an adult. There is so much here that is amazing, just like the graphic novel and most of it exists in the premise, her story and autobiography.

The Soundtrack – The soundtrack is minimalist and is all the stronger for it as emotions are conveyed in perfect timing as the music matches up with the animation. Olivier Bernet is fantastic!

The Animation – The animation is all hand drawn and is some of the best animation I have ever seen. It looks like the graphic novel while still holding a unique style all it’s own. Even if the story wasn’t as great as it is, I would recommend this movie for the soundtrack and art alone.  Je Suis Bein Content, Pumpkin 3D and what they created in Perseprod Studio, who was behind the animation.

Revolution – We see prisoners freed at the fall of the Shah and the hope for a new tomorrow, and also the rise of the Ayatollah and how the revolution is lost in how a new oppressive regime arises. It’s powerfully executed through Marjane and her family’s eyes.

The Iran-Iraq War – We see the cost of war in this as Marjane returns to her old home and sees a hand of a person crushed beneath and building, the building her parents could have been in. The human cost is a constant reminder in this, from a childhood friend who lost the use of his arm and leg, to the fear of trying to change the current regime because the country is tired of war and fighting. War breaks people and nations. We also see the corruption of the Western nations who funded both sides in the conflict.

The Characters – Most of the named characters, especially Marjane’s family members have fascinating back-stories and characterizations. I’ll get into the reasons why next.

God – The best minor character who isn’t a family member is God who is portrayed as a great bearded man who talks to Marjane as Marjane is his prophet. He is a very Deistic God as he points out that the sufferings that were caused were humanity and not him. In that way he is there to comfort but never to do anything, beyond sending Marjane back from depression to face the world.

Uncle Anouche – Uncle Anouche is the communist who was arrested by the Shah when he tried to return to see his family again after hiding in the Soviet Union. He was in prison and tortured for 9 years and after being freed connects with Marjane and gives her hope of the world that could be. He’s the idealist which makes the rise of the Ayatollah and loss of an actual Republic all the sadder as he tries to justify it as “The common folk need religion, they’ll come around, this regime won’t be corrupt.” Only to find himself executed later. He represents the loss of freedom best as he was the one who was always struggling for it. Iggy Pop played him in the English version of the film and did a good job in the role. In the story he is the reminder of the work still to be done and the willingness to stand up to tyranny for liberty and freedom, which Marjane does on a few occasions.

Father – Sean Penn voices the Father, who at the core is the man also hoping for a brighter future, but also aware of the past and how his ancestor was executed for being a rival to the Shah before the British put the Shah in power. The Father is aware of both his own nation’s corruption and how the west has been a part of it…whether providing weapons to Iran and Iraq during the Iran-Iraq War or hoisting up the Shah. It is thanks to him that Marjane has skepticism in Europe, which is healthy. One of the themes is to always doubt and question.

Mother – Mother is voiced by Catherine Deneuve and is the voice of practicality. For her there isn’t’ time to resist oppression. The most a person can do is put their head down and get out if they can and have a chance to live elsewhere. She doesn’t like the status quo but feels powerless to stop it as she has lost family to both the Shah and the Ayatollah. This keeps her with so much sadness and why at the end she asks Marjane to leave Iran and never return until they are free. Her story is one of tragedy that she never truly gets to be with her daughter for any extended period of time, thanks to the oppression that she experiences.

Grandmother – Grandmother is one of the best characters in the film. She’s been divorced and remarried and expresses her perspective no matter who it may turn others off. She calls out Marjane for throwing a stranger under the bus so the police wouldn’t do anything to her, she reminds Marjane to stay true to herself and to live with integrity and she supports Marjane’s childhood dream of being a Prophet of God. She is one of the most revolutionary characters because she lost her husband to the Shah and about as far from Fundamentalist Muslim as you can get. She drinks, she has fun and she speaks truth to power. I completely get why Marjane idealizes her and I think she is a character worthy of that. The film ends with her death, again showing the tragedy and how oppression kept her from her hero and that in Grandmother’s lifetime she was never able to live in a free country. Gena Rowlands is fantastic!

Marjane – This is Marjane’s story and it is powerful as it explores all of her struggles. From her experiencing the Iran-Iraq War and the fall of the Shah, to the rise of the Ayatollah’s fundamentalist religious regime and all the religious laws that were brought about to her experience in Europe where she lost her homes because of how she resisted and because of how lost she was in trying to find her identity as an Iranian and also as someone who had spent so much time growing up outside of Iran without her parents. “Persepolis” is her answer to that and in it we see first hand her finding and accepting all the different parts of her identity and in turn becoming whole even after losing her home (Iran), family and husband in a divorce. She is able to accept herself and grow and the film shows this beautifully. Chiara Mastroianni does a wonderful job as grown up Marjane while Amethyste Frezignac does a great job as her childhood self.

The Messages – The Messages are powerful in this film, just like the Graphic novel, with the strongest being “Be true to yourself.” There are also the themes of “Remember where you came from,” and that oppression everywhere is unjust.

Marjane leaves Iran again because Iran is not free and her parents are still trapped there at the end, but want her to go after everyone she has lost to the oppressive regime. This sadness is a call for reform…the ending has a broken people waiting for change who are tired of the fighting after the Iran-Iraq war and all the political dissidents the Ayatollah’s Regime has killed. No excuses are made for tyranny ever…whether it’s the Shah or the Ayatollah, the forms of oppression as witnessed through Marjane’s eyes are obvious and stark. Another theme is to always doubt and questions which Uncle Anouche died doing until the end.

This ties into the theme of resistance which we see Marjane do on multiple occasions…from the Hijab being a double standard since guys can where whatever they want, to the nuns who got on her case for eating alone or her European classmates gossiping about her behind her back and her calling them out. Resistance is a huge theme of this film.

Okay: The Punks – They are all nihilists and we don’t get to know them like we do in the graphic novel. One of them was also from the Middle East and she never made an appearance leaving only the Western Punks who just hang around and are there to show that apathy is pointless since that is all they are.

The Boyfriends and Husband – The boyfriends and husbands don’t really get explored. They are moments pretty much but we mostly see her reaction to things not working, we don’t get to know them as characters like in the novel.

The Cons: Things Left Out and New Additions – Biggest issue was how some character stories were left out and some reactions to breakups went on a little long.

The animation style is beautiful and dreamlike and the soundtrack contributes to that. I completely get why it was nominated for an Academy Award. This is a film that is timeless and shows such a rich perspective on identity, integrity, justice, war, oppression and family. All these are a part of Marjane and her experiences and she tells her story so beautifully here, even if it isn’t done as well as the Graphic Novel, which you should read by the way. Also, see this film too. Chances are you will learn so much watching this and experience a beautiful story with some of the best music and animation in any film.

Final Score: 9.6 / 10. Not perfect but a favorite by far.