Sherlock – Series 4, Episode 3 – “The Final Problem” – Bad “Sherlock” Fan Fiction

sherlock-the-final-problem

    God, I hate what Moffat did to “Sherlock.” He pretty did to “Sherlock” what did with Amy and making her “The Impossible Girl” and a plot device that only existed for the Doctor and nothing more. This episode has more of that too and ruins what could have been a great character if she hadn’t been turned into really bad fan fiction. If they make another season of “Sherlock,” and Moffat and Gatiss are in charge, I probably won’t watch it…not after the finale like this. This was an episode that was so bad on so many levels and makes me worried for the next season of “Doctor Who,” as Moffat is still the showrunner on that show.

   “The Final Problem” was written by Stephen Moffat and Mark Gatiss (the creators of the show so you’d think they’d know better than to write crap like this) and directed by Benjamin Caron.

SPOILERS ahead

  Sherlock and Mycroft’s sister has escaped from an asylum and it is up to the brothers and Watson to stop her as she tries to kill them with a drone that is also a bomb and reveals to them that she now controls the asylum, putting them through tests so that she is entertained.

The Pros: Cinematography – The cinematography is always beautiful (though the slow motion jumping out of an explosion was stupid and took away from some of the nice cinematography). Still, it looked nice even though the writing was crap.

Soundtrack – Music has always been one of the solid parts of that show and there are some great violin pieces, but that is it. The music this entire season has been great but it doesn’t save this episode.

The Cons: Character Assassination – Did you think Mycroft, Sherlock and Watson were fleshed out characters…well prepare for them to become caricatures of themselves!

John Watson – Watson is there to be the soldier, he says this multiple times and reminds Sherlock to be the soldier…and that’s it. It’s like someone heard about who Watson was on this show and wrote the only thing we were told about in the first episode in the first series…

Mycroft Holmes – Mycroft is manipulative and cares…we see this Sherlock and Eurus…I guess? Nope the writers don’t know what to do with Mycroft. He is manipulative and has a good heart and isn’t as smart as he thinks he is. He is only descriptors and not a character.

Sherlock Holmes – Sherlock is the genius who cares who apparently now  will do anything to save anyone no matter how monstrous they are. Given there was no bases for this prior I’m not sure where it came from given he killed someone at the end of last season. He apparently really loves his sister even though she killed a bunch of people including his best friend. Sherlock ceases to be a character though too as all his past actions are erased so that he can have a relationship with his sister and grow even though both have become plot devices though more so Eurus since Holmes is still driving the story and gets the emotional payoff.

Eurus Holmes the Plot Device – Eurus is crazy in the same way Carrie from “Carrie” is and Jean Grey is in “X-Men 3.” She exists only as a plot device to explore Sherlock’s trauma. She is crazy for the sake of being crazy and no reason is given. She is crap writing and is like “The Impossible Girl” in relationship to the Doctor. She exists only for Sherlock’s and Mycroft’s emotional growth and nothing more.

Happily Ever After – The ending is corny and apparently Mary being dead is okay since it was all about Watson and Sherlock the entire time! God this script is a hack script.

     This was an episode that started out with so much promise…the ending of the lying detective at least set up Eurus as being a fully fledged human being, apparently that was too much to ask though and Gatiss and Moffat had to “Carrie” / “Jean Grey” her. Everything that happens in this episode is for Sherlock and it doesn’t even fit within his character. The episode is literally retconning memories so that everything is about Eurus and Sherlock’s relationship, a relationship that never existed before. I can’t recommend this episode and I honestly fear for Moffat’s last season of “Doctor Who.” If we get this level of writing than Capaldi’s Doctor is going to be ruined. Watch at your own risk but this is an episode of television that I wouldn’t recommend to anyone as you won’t get back that time and the writing is a whole list of what not to do.

Final Score: 3 / 10

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Sherlock – Special – “The Abominable Bride” – Confusing at Times but a Powerful Message

Sherlock The Abominable Bride

      “The Abominable Bride” is an episode that is a bit unfocused but comes together at the end and never stops being fun. It more than makes up for the end of Season 3 and even the overall message of the internal mystery is powerful too and is timeless, which is something Moffat usually doesn’t cover in his episodes. I’ll get into more of the details later but this episode was a trip (in more than one way) and for non-spoiler thoughts, is well worth checking out.

      The episode was directed by Douglas Mackinnon and written by Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss.

Spoilers ahead

       The episode takes place in Victorian England where Sherlock is seeking to solve the case of the Abominable Bride who killed herself but has come back from the dead and is hunted down her husband and other evil men. All is not as it appears to be though as even the story is meta.

The Pros: Cinematography – The cinematography is beautiful per usual, which one thing that has been true of even the weakest episodes of “Sherlock.” There is great use of freezing the frame and using the London fog to cast mystery and shadow and with it an element of horror which lended strength to the narrative both main and meta. Suzie Lavelle did a great job.

Soundtrack – The music continues to be one of the strongest parts of this series and plays into the mystery, horror and self reflection that really defines this episode and the series at it’s best when it is at it’s strongest. David Arnold and Michael Price did a wonderful job.

Dialogue – The dialogue is snappy, sharp and natural and fit the characters beautifully. This was an episode that didn’t drag because the writing kept things moving, especially in how the different characters interacted.

Characters – Characters have always been the strongest part of the show and the Special is a shining example of this. Though there are some glorified cameos I won’t really mention since I don’t really feel the cameos got exploration.

Mary – Mary is fighting for equality in England and she is the one who discovers the organization that created the Abominable Bride. It is wonderful seeing her front and center and I hope she becomes part of John and Sherlock and that they become a trio. Amanda Abbington once again does a fantastic job.

Moriarty – Andrew Scott is back, though it is only in Sherlock’s mind palace as we learn part of his plan was to trap Sherlock inside his head as he really did die and wanted to bring Sherlock down with him, like he did in the story of the Reichenbach Fall. In the end he fails to account for Watson though and it is his downfall as within his mind Sherlock is able to realize that Moriarty is not alive and that all of this was a ploy to trap him so that his final attack on the world could go forward.

Mycroft – Mark Gatiss is my favorite Mycroft and in this we see the tender side of his relationship to Sherlock as he was there to pull Sherlock out of his addiction and cared for him. We also see a fat Mycroft in the past (and how he looks in the stories and novels) which is a treat. He never stops being Mycroft though and we see him team up with Mary to help and protect John and Sherlock. Gatiss truly owns this role and he gets great character development this episode.

Watson – Martin Freeman’s Watson gets some wonderful character development in this as in the past we see that Sherlock uses how Watson sees him in order to solve cases and build himself up and that Watson truly is smart and has learned a lot from Sherlock. He saves Sherlock from his mind Moriarty and helps him wake up as well as solving the Abominable Bride case with him and his wife Mary. He is a great character as always.

Sherlock – Benedict Cumberbatch really owns this role and is a natural Sherlock Holmes. I really liked seeing his Victorian self solving the case and them actually dealing with the dangers of his addiction as it takes him going under to solve the case of the Abominable Bride and realize that Moriarty is dead but he put things in place in case that ever did happen. His arc is learning to accept help and letting go of his addiction to needing a case or drugs to feel alive. It’s very well done and Sherlock actually grows over the course of the episode.

Equality and Justice – The suffragette movement is addressed and the fact that some of them are using the Abominable Bride for justice against evil men. It’s really cool as it uses the sexism of Victorian society to show how far we’ve come and how far there is to go.

Letting Go and No Longer Alone – Sherlock’s arc is letting go of Moriarty in his mind and accepting his death and accepting the love from his friends….that his brother, John and Mary are there for him and that is how he can defeat and has defeated whatever has come his way. No longer the superhuman, he is now human.

Okay/Pro: The Ending – We know now that Moriarty truly is dead but he put something in place for when he does die and now it is up to Sherlock and John to solve it. I liked them talking in the past, it was some of the best John and Sherlock moments…and Sherlock did get some great monologues. I’m doing it as okay since it took Sherlock overdosing to get there.

Okay: The Bride – The organization the Bride is a part of is wonderful, but the bride is a plot device and never fully grows beyond it. She isn’t a bad plot device but a plot device is not a character. Lestrade had the same problem.

Lestrade – Graves does a good job with what he’s given but he’s just kind of there to give Sherlock the plot to solve. I would have liked to see more with him as he’s never given the chance to fully be his own character.

    This was a favorite episode and clearly showed that Gatiss and Moffat are back in their game when it comes to this show. I was disappointed with Series 3, especially in it’s treatment of Mary in the finale and how the kill was handled, as well as the villain being one note…but this got back on track. Sherlock has always been about the characters and this episode showed once more why we keep coming back to this show and what drew us to the stories of Sherlock Holmes in the first place.

Final Score: 9.4 / 10

“Sherlock” Pilot – Series 1, Episode 1 – “A Study in Pink” – The Thrill of the Hunt and Dangerous Detachment

a study in pink sherlock

   “Sherlock” has become far greater than the show it initially come from as it has not only boosted Cumberbatch’s career it also brought about a resurgant interest in the character and stories of “Sherlock Holmes.” This is also the show that put Steven Moffat as a writer and director on the map and you can see his ideas in this show rub off him being the showrunner of “Doctor Who.”

    “A Study in Pink” was directed by Paul McGuigan and written by Steven Moffat.

     The story involves Dr. Watson’s return from Afghanistan and his attempts to get acclimated to life again as he is pulled into a mystery from a possible flatmate Sherlock Holmes in which a string of similar suicides are tied to something far more sinister taking place.

The Pros: Cinematography – The cinematography is beautiful! There is a dark tone over everything and it captures the isolation that both Watson and Sherlock feel as they are both outsiders in different ways where the thing that connects them is their thrill of the chase and the mystery in life’s game.

The Soundtrack – David Arnold and Michael Price did a fantastic job on this soundtrack! It captures the methodic feel of Holmes as well as the thrill that Watson and Holmes take in the hunt.

The Mystery – The mystery is fascinating as we have supposed suicides but as we learn more that it is based on a 50-50 chance of murder dying as well. From here it is how well a dying man does mind games on his victims and how others react to the bodies left behind. The clue that makes finding the murder possible is a lady pink not having her pink suitcase present which lead to the discovery that she planted the phone on the murder allowing Sherlock and Watson to find the murder.

The Cabbie – The Cabbie is a great threat as he sees himself as carrying for his children’s future as he lost his wife and is terminally ill. To this end he gets sponsorship from Moriarty and is willing to risk his own life each time as he knows each death means his children get more. His story is tragic and shows how desperation can change people.

Mycroft Holmes – Mark Gatiss is how I envision Mycroft to be, a brilliant, over-controlling man who at the end of the day wants to do his duty and protect his brother. Gatiss shows this in Mycroft perfectly and we get a fake out initially where he is presented as possibly being Moriarty but later we see that clearly is not the case.

Dr. Watson – Watson is a veteran from the war and his arc is finding the thrill in the chase again as the lack of stimulation makes him feel isolated in his return to England. He does not have friends which is one reason Sherlock is able to attach to him and vise versa, they are both people outside what is normally considered good and it makes them compelling to watch as they grow to like one another. Martin Freeman is great in the role.

Sherlock – Sherlock drives the story and he is a dick. We see him completely oblivious to people’s feelings towards him unless it is hate and he is constantly berating the police force for their stupidity. His arc is coming to treat others with more respect and having greater social awareness, Watson functions as his external conscience in this way as he is there to shoot the cabbie when Sherlock is about to play the game where he has a 50-50 chance of taking the pill that will kill him. Benedict Cumberbatch is fantastic!

Okay: Ms. Hudson – She is a kind old lady with a string of unstable relationships. She is the mother figure to them and is there to remind them to be outside themselves as she is always present at 221B Baker Street.

Lestrade – Lestrade is the well meaning leader of the police who is empathetic and in over his head. I wanted to see more of the character as usually in Sherlock adaptations he is the faceless antagonist there to make Sherlock look good. This time he feels like an actual character just doing the best he can. Rupert Graves is good in what little he is able to do in the plot.

The Cons: Talking at Women – Whether it is Ms. Hudson, Mycroft’s assistant or others most of the women are talked at and are there to spit exposition at. This was annoying as they deserved to be fleshed out more and Sherlock, though he is a dick was usually always courteous in the books as he had to hear the person to learn.

Faceless Minor Characters – There are a few people on the police force who are antagonistic for the sake of being antagonistic and it struck me as petty and only there to make Sherlock look better by comparison. They serve no purpose but to be in the way to solving the case.

When the Police Became Stupid – There is one point where they are tracking the phone that we know the killer has and the police just stop looking for it and leave…this is after they came to Sherlock’s flat to get the evidence of the suitcase. This was plot stupidity as they should have followed up on finding the phone as they would have found the killer. There was no reason for this except to make Watson and Sherlock the heroes without any outside help.

“Sherlock” is a favorite show though as I have watched it more the problems in Moffat’s writing become more apparent…and I would rate “Hannibal” above “Sherlock” at this point, and not only because “Hannibal” had dignity enough to end. When you are dealing with human characters the story can’t be continuously rebooted as it is with “Doctor Who” and though I’m excited to watch more “Sherlock,” Season 3 was troubling in a lot of ways that I’ll get into when I review this show as a whole.

    For now, I recommend this episode as it is a great introduction to this show and Martin Freeman as Watson and Benedict Cumberbatch as Holmes are two very amazing interpretations that are worth coming back too.

Final Score: 9  / 10