Star Trek: Enterprise – Season 2, Episode 15 – “Cease Fire” – The First Steps Towards Peace

 

    “Cease Fire” is an example of “Enterprise” doing “Star Trek” right. This is an episode all about diplomacy and gives us echoes of the foundings of the Federation as well as some great character work with both the Andorians and Vulcans. Before I get into spoilers, this is an episode I’d recommend to any fan of “Star Trek.” It is well worth the outing and a great example of what “Enterprise” was capable of.

The episode was directed by David Straiton and written by Chris Black.

A territorial dispute between the Andorians and Vulcans over a planet leads to Commander Shran calling Captain Archer to negotiate a cease fire.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The History and Politics – The history and politics that are the backdrop to this episode are what give it so much strength to the narrative. We have a territory that was once held by the Andorians but that the Vulcans kicked them off of because they feared it as being a jumping off point to attacking their territory. In this episode the Andorians back and are furious as they see the work they were putting into the territory to make habitable (as well as their original claim to it) as nothing more than Vulcan imperialism and aggression. This is handled really well as what this territory and the war with Vulcan means has quite a few different Vulcan and Andorian points of view. This isn’t a simple fix and the politics and history behind the territorial dispute illustrate that.

Soval and T’Pol – Soval and T’Pol have a really cool relationship in this episode. In this we see that Soval admires her and believes that she could have easily been his second-in-command if she hadn’t worked with Enterprise. T’Pol never states it outright but she admits how much she has grown with the crew and that she is grateful for Soval’s belief in her. For much of the episode she is protecting him when their ship is shot down in enemy territory and Shran’s ask of Captain Archer was that he wanted to speak directly to Soval. Soval fulfills the end of his bargain and from it begins to see where T’Pol is coming from with the humans and it is beautifully handled.

Commander Shran and the Andorians – Jeffrey Combs is the best part of “Enterprise” and always has been. He brings complexity and politics to any episode he is in and in many ways functions as an anti-hero or outright hero in conflicts that humanity and Vulcan face. In this episode we see why he is trusted with leadership as he doesn’t settle with go-betweens and arrests his second-in-command when she attempts to assisinate Archer, T’Pol and Soval. It is this conflict that helps him see that his side is hardly perfect either as the Andorians and Vulcans are both given nuance in this dispute. Combs steals every scene is in. The Andorians are also very distinct in this episode. They are warriors have an honor code and it drives all they do.

The Role of Enterprise – The role of the crew of Enterprise is handled wonderfully in this through the actions primarily of Trip. In this episode he is involved with stalling the Vulcans and Andorians from attacking each other to give time for Soval to get to Shran. In the end he succeeds and this is where the crew being stubborn is only an asset in a conflict that may finally have a chance to end.

The Cons:

Holding Archer Accountable – Archer is not a good diplomat. He talks down to whomever he’s around and seems incapable of seeing any view beyond his own except when he’s talking to Shran. When he’s talking to the Vulcans he is just as stubborn as the worst of how Vulcans are presented in “Enterprise.” He does succeed and his mentality that Trip carries on does save the day, but I still hate that mentality. Archer’s diplomacy made me appreciate the diplomatic skills of Kirk and Janeway…and both them are hardly subtle.

This is a great episode and definitely a favorite in “Enterprise.” This episode helps set the stage for further negotiations and conflict that Andoria will have with the other members of the future Federation and I love that we get to see the Vulcans and Andorians developed further as people. This episode is what I’d love in future episode of “Enterprise” as developing the world and lore is really where this show was strongest, especially in regards to the species who would later be founding members of the Federation.

Final Score: 9 / 10 This episode is great and easily one of the best episodes of “Enterprise.” The only thing keeping it from perfection is how insufferable Archer is at times.

“Watchmen” Season 1 – A Solid Sequel That Speaks to Oppression and Justice

Amazon.com: Watch Watchmen - Season 1 | Prime Video

    “Watchmen” is one of my favorite comics of all time. It is a complete story that I’ve gone back and re-read multiple times and each time I notice more details or layers in the story. Alan Moore is truly a genius warlock. “Watchmen” was always going to have more stories come out of it though. Alan Moore never owned it so DC incorporated the characters into the rest of the DC Universe and did a whole “Before Watchmen” series that I have yet to read. So knowing this I was curious to see what Lindelof and HBO would do. Suffice to say, overall I think they did a good job. “Watchmen” never needed a sequel or prequel but this at least tells a story that matters.

This is a flawed and really good series. Like the original “Watchmen” it tackles matters of oppression and power of the past and present and gives us the evil and insidiousness of white supremacy as well as exploring how we face and deal with trauma. Without getting into spoilers this is a show I would recommend. The main parts where it falls is when it tries to incorporate too much from the original comics and where it stands strongest is where it tells it’s own powerful story.

The series was created by Damon Lindelof and produced by HBO.

The story follows Angela Abar / Sister Night (Regina King) as she works to uncover and stop a white supremacist organization known as the Seventh Kavalry who take their inspiration from Rorschach.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Soundtrack – Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross and an amazing job on this soundtrack. They give this series a dark and fantastic feel to it and it was part of what kept me involved in the story through all the different events that happen. The music is intense and blends so well with the events that take place.

The Universe – This is the Universe of “Watchmen” a world of superheroes, high technology and that reflects the problems of our own world. Like the original comic this is a world meant to reflect the oppression in our own and this show’s universe captures that beautifully.

Wade Tillman / Looking Glass – Wade Tillman was a Jehovah’s Witness who was there during the event of the Giant Squid that stopped the Doomsday clock. After he is conned and left naked in a carnival he leaves the hall of mirrors to the apocalypse from the event. This changes everything about his character and he becomes a person seeking truth as part of the police force and becoming the vigilante Looking Glass who wears a tin foil mask (and has it in his hats) to protect from psychic attacks. He is played so well by Tim Blake Nelson and seeing his arc payoff as he takes off the mask as he confronts his trauma and film is powerfully executed in the narrative.

Will Reeves / Hooded Justice – Will Reeves’s story is the main overarching narrative and the strongest arc in the show. Will’s family was killed by Klan during the Tulsa Massacre of 1921 where white supremacists burned Black Wall Street to the ground and massacred the residents living there. Will and a baby he rescues are some of few survivors of the event. After this he becomes a cop in New York City and attempts to take on the Ku Klux Klan as a cop but due to systemic racism and white supremacists on the police force he is nearly lynched and adopts the identity Hooded Justice to fight against them. Eventually this costumed identity and his own repressed sexuality lead to his relationship ending between his wife and son (He has a relationship with Captain Metropolis like in the comics) and he stops being Hooded Justice until Dr. Manhattan pulls him back into the story in order to protect his Granddaughter from the Klan who are active in Tulsa. During his time as Hooded Justice he also has to pretend to be white under the mask due the racism and prejudice of those around him with Captain Metropolis being the only one who knows his true identity. 3 different actors portray Will Reeves and each of them do a fantastic job. Louis Gossett Jr. plays him when he is 100, Jovan Adepo plays him during his time in the Minutemen and

The Pasts Revealed – The strongest parts of the story are the backstories of the characters. I loved getting Angela Abar’s backstory growing up in Vietnam and how the murder of her parents inspired her to be a cop. Looking Glass’s story as a victim of the psychic attack on New York with the giant Squid was fantastic too as was Will Reeves’s story. These stories are all told in flashback and are the strongest narratives in the show as a whole.

Systemic Oppression – Systemic Oppression through white supremacism and colonialism are major themes in the show. The story begins with Will surviving the massacre of Tulsa by the Klan and we see how entrenched racism is within the police force and politics of the United States as he grows up. In each part of his life it is revealed in a different way. From the cops being members of the KKK and protecting the KKK, from having to pretend to be white among the Minutemen and the Police Chief and Senator from Tulsa also being members of the KKK and his working with Lady Trieu to stop them from getting Dr. Manhattan’s power. Will Reeves and Angela Abar reveal these stories. We also see colonialism in the death of Angela’s parents as Vietnam is made the 51st state and it is a man fighting for Vietnamese Independence who kills them by setting off a bomb. I wish the colonial narrative had been explored further but how it explores systemic racism and white supremacy in the United States is done extremely well.

Tulsa, Oklahoma – The greatest stories in this show are the ones that tackle the oppression in the past and present. We start with the Tulsa Massacre and how that shapes Will Reeves and see that oppression in White Night when white supremacists attack Angela Abar and her family. Tulsa holds the history of so much oppression in the United States and the show doesn’t shy away from that reality as well as also giving us the story of African-Americans who fought to stay against racism and oppression and make a life after it was taken away from them and their ancestors. Tulsa is the heart of the show as all the events of the show transpire here and the ways it explores oppression and justice are part of what lends so much power to the story.

Okay:

Trieu Industries – Trieu Industries is one of my the major players of the story as Lady Trieu is trying to capture the power of Dr. Manhattan and is the one pulling the strings behind many of the events of the story. She is daughter of Adrian Veidt and wants to use the power of Dr. Manhattan to end injustice. We get some of her motivation in her mother’s story Bian, who was a Vietnamese immigrant who was a cleaning lady who worked for Veidt and stole a semen sample to get back at him. From this we can see her aims and she wipes out the Klan who are under the guise of Cyclops and the Seventh Kavalry but we don’t get more beyond this. I hated the fact that they made her Veidt daughter as she didn’t need that “Watchmen” connection to be a compelling character and it made the world of the show so small as everyone was connected to a member of the Watchmen in some way which limited the original stories that were being told. Trieu Industries wasn’t bad but there was so much unused potential and Lady Trieu’s desire to become a God needed much more exploration.

The Cons:

Dr. Manhattan and His Use – Dr. Manhattan functions as a McGuffin in the story whose very prescence ruins the stakes. He causes a paradox when his conversations with Angela Abar cause events to happen that already happened and the fact that he is only defined as those wanting his power causes him to be ildefined. We get to see him become a God and create a civilization on the moon Europa but that doesn’t go anywhere beyond getting Adrian Veidt out of the story for a bit until he can be there to save the day and be held accountable for the original Psychic Squid attack. Dr. Manhattan’s only purpose seems to be to connect characters together (Will and Angela) and to be the McGuffin all the enemies want. This is a shame as the time he is the human Cal are quite compelling. It is once he becomes a God again that things fall apart and in turn reveal the weakness in the plot.

The Final – The final ends with Adrian Veidt returning back to Earth after his daughter rescues him from his asked for exile on Europa (where he simply entertains himself until being rescued). He stops his daughter with the squids as he freezes them and breaks Lady Trieu’s machine, keeping her from ascending to godhood. After that he is taken in by Laurie Blake and Wade Tillman to stand crimes for the 3 million he killed with the psychic squid attack on New York and we get the suggestion that Angela, who was in a relationship with Dr. Manhattan may have inherited his power. Given how his power was useless for saving people so much of the time I wonder if this is really a rewarding ending. Being Dr. Manhattan is a curse and this show does little to show that it would not be the case for whomever became him next. Veidt being brought to justice and killing his daughter felt tacked on and as great as Jeremy Irons is as Veidt, his story was the weakest.

This is a series that isn’t perfect and I think telling it an anthological way would lend to the strengths inherent in the writing. This is Angela Abar and Will Reeves’s story is the best part of the show and speaks to oppression in the past and present. It is the times that it gets cosmic with Dr. Manhattan and Ozymandius that it really falls apart. This is a show I would still highly recommend. HBO made it free to watch over Juneteenth to educate people about the Tulsa Massacre and to remind people of the ongoing oppression of African-Americans here in the United States as well as the impacts of colonialism in the world. This is a powerful show that is well worth your time. I hope it inspires action as the fight for equity and justice is ongoing and it is only through action and work that anything will change.

8.6 / 10 The ending issues bring down the solid character narratives.

In the ongoing fight for justice and equality here is the Tulsa Justice Fund.

https://www.tulsajusticefund.com/

Star Trek: The Original Series – Season 2, Episode 7 – “Wolf in the Fold” – Scotty on Trial

Star Trek S02E07 Wolf in the Fold - video dailymotion

   “Wolf in the Fold” provides an interesting premise and even has some good moments of tension before it fails as a story. This is an episode that focuses on Scotty, but we learn almost nothing about him, and even the main threat ends up not feeling like a threat. This is all besides the misogyny that runs through the episode. The premise had a lot of promise but absolutely fails and I’ll get into why below.

The episode was directed by Joseph Pevney and written by Robert Bloch.

The story involves Scotty being blamed for a murder when the crew visits Argelius II.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Politics – In this story we see the politics between Argelius and Starfleet. Argelius is a free love society that hasn’t experienced a murder until the one that kicks off the episode. This gives an interesting dynamic as Kirk wants to do it by their laws but ends up offering up the computer as an answer when the Prefect is willing to try it after his wife is murdered during a seance to find the truth. From this, I wish he’d pushed back against more. He is the final judge on Scotty’s fate but he is very agreeable with Starfleet, even after his wife is murdered.

The Computer – The idea of using the computer to find the truth is really neat. It has all the information and can track if a person is lying or not. It is from the computer they found out the spirit of Jack the Ripper is the one responsible. This part of the episode is slow but I liked the computer being used the solve the mystery. It fit the theme of tech. solutions over supernatural which has always been a theme of “Star Trek.”

The Premise – The idea of a member of the crew being framed for murder on an alien world is fascinating. This base premise alone would have been enough if the politics between Argelius II and the Federation had been played up. Sadly the idea of the premise is not paid off.

The Cons:

Misogyny – Everyone woman we meet in this story is either being ogled by the crew (the belly dancer who gets killed) or is responsible for a problem. Scotty is on shoreleave because a female crewman caused a problem that lead to him hitting his head. This is so weak and isn’t helped by the text of the episode as all the other woman who we meet end up needing rescuing from Jack the Ripper or are killed by him.

The Enemy – Jack the Ripper is the enemy and his main host ends up being Mr. Hengist, an Argelian who is played by John Fiedler who voices Piglet in “Winnie the Pooh.” This does not work. Piglet’s voice is not ever threatening and the spirit taking control of the ship is for such a short time we don’t even see what the enemy is capable of. The moment the killings end on Argelius II all tension is gone and that is largely through how Jack the Ripper is presented. He just isn’t scary.

The Ending – The crew ends up fighting Jack the Ripper and him existing through fear by being pumped full of drugs that induce happiness by McCoy. This causes such whiplash that I don’t know why it was even included in the episode and focused on. Everyone is laughing, which takes away what tension there was by Jack the Ripper taking control of the ship.

This was an episode full of interesting ideas that it can’t execute. No ideas are delved into deeper and the supernatural threat just isn’t threatening. I appreciate that the episode is about someone outside of Kirk, McCoy or Spock but Scotty just doesn’t get enough exploration. This episode is reactive when it could have been so much more. There are the seeds of good ideas here, but failure to explore any of those ideas deeply leads to a bad episode.

Final Score: 5 / 10

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood – An Amazing Show About Politics, Philosophy and the Fully Realized Life

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood | Fullmetal Alchemist Wiki | Fandom

    “Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” is one of my favorite animes of all time. This is an anime that has intriguing characters, philosophy, politics and a narrative that builds to a fantastic and rewarding ending. If animes are your thing, you should definitely check it out. This is a re-watch for me as I was looking for more long form completed stories to see during the Covid-19 crisis. Suffice to say, it still very much holds up. There is a 2003 adaptation that is quite different from the manga that I did not enjoy as much, but at some point will revisit. If you want to see some really fantastic deep video content checkout Wisecrack and Lowart’s takes on “Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood.” They are amazing deep dives well worth your time and I want to give them a shout out before I explore my own thoughts on the show.

The series is based off the manga created by Hiromu Arakawa, directed by Yasuhiro Irie, written by Hiroshi Ōnogi and produced by Bones.

The story follows State Alchemists Ed and Al of Amestris as they seek to get Al’s body back and free him from the armor his soul lives in. This all unfolds as the brothers and other characters slowly uncover the truth of their country and the nature of Alchemy.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

The Soundtrack – Akira Senju’s gothic inspired soundtrack is so beautiful and helps build the tension of the narrative so well. This is a story with consequences and that is reflected in the composition of the score who pulls on gothic choirs and somber instrumentals.

The Action – This show has some of the best fights you will see in any anime. Any time a character is fighting a Homonculus you get to see the full potential of both the fighters. You get the superhuman speeds of the inhuman homonculi and the power and magic behind the attacks the alchemists bring or the martial arts from the characters from Xing. It is hard to choose a favorite fight but the personal nature of anyone facing Wrath is extremely warding as well as Lust against Mustang.

The Politics – The politics of “FMA: Brotherhood” are one of the strongest aspects of the story. We have the Ishvalin Civil War, which is used as cover for Amestris to destroy them. We see them clash with their northern neighbors Drachma who they’ve clashed with in the past and the rise of to power as many Generals vie to control Amestris as they plot the downfall of the Furor Bradley. Within all this we see the stories of the Ishvalin refugees, meet characters from Xing, seeking immortality through Alchemy and see the clashing between clans happening there. All of these struggles are told through character interaction and we come to care about the people and their missions.

The Characters – The characters are the best part of “FMA: Brotherhood” as it is their struggles and stories that bring meaning to the political and philosophical battles that unfold. This show made me care about random characters who were introduced as muscle for enemies and even the villains get explored in a compelling way. The exploration of the villains is best executed through the stories of the Homonculi who will get their own section in this review. What makes things work the most is the characters and their relationships change. Ed and Al inspire people to be better and even they go through crisises of identity when faced with the monstrous acts of others or the consequences of their choices or situation. This applies to all the characters and I felt for anyone who died over the course of the show.

Homunculus | Fullmetal Alchemist Wiki | Fandom

The Homonculi – The Homonculi are the primary antagonists of the series. They are lead by “Father” who became the form of Hohenheim after he used the destruction of Xerxes to create a philosopher’s stone. After this he tore his voices from himself and made them his children. These are the Seven Homonculi – Wrath, Pride, Envy, Greed, Lust, Sloth and Gluttony. All of them are compelling with most being muscle at different points. Gluttony and Sloth are muscle. Lust and Envy are the ones trying to get under characters skin and acting as assassins early on to keep Father’s plot hidden. Pride is the one watching and controlling a lot of what is going on. Greed is doing his own thing and Wrath is King Bradley. Greed and Wrath were my favorites and I’ll into that further.

Wrath / King Bradley – Wrath was an orphan raised from birth by mad scientists to some day potentially lead Amestris. He survives the philosopher stone that is put into him and so much of his life is seeking his own choice. This is one reason the rebellion against him gets as bad as it does. Wrath wants something unpredictable and challenges to fight as it is only in battle he truly feels alive. He also still holds onto his humanity as he took a wife who clearly cares about even though I don’t think he is capable of love. He is one of the best antagonists in the series and is dynamic, charismatic and threatening anytime he is in action.

Greed  – Greed is the Homonculi who grows. In the beginning he has a gang of Chimera (part-human, part-animal creations) who Wrath takes out as he is seen as a threat to Father’s plans. Father destroys him but later introduces him once more as a pawn to be used when Ling, a Lord of Xing is captured. From here Greed protects Father and stays out of his way until Ling establishes more control and the memories of what Wrath did to him come back. This eventually leads to him realize that he desires people and power in order to have friends, which leads to his final sacrifice to make Father vulnerable in order for Ed to finally defeat him. It is a powerful arc and I loved that he changed over the course of the show.

Defining Tragedy – One thing that defines the stakes and choices in this story is that of tragedy. Scar and the death of his brother and the Ishvalin people, Scar’s murder of Winry’s parents who were caring for him, Ed and Al’s loss of their mother (and Al’s body and Ed’s arm and leg), Izumi and the loss of her child, the murder of Maes Hughes and the death Nina and Alexander. All this happens early on or is revealed over the course of the earlier arcs. It is beautifully done, and keeps the stakes high through the series. Loss is what defines these characters and it is their facing that loss and the consequences that they change.

Forgiveness – Forgiveness is a running theme of the show as it is the first step for a character who has done wrong to realize they can atone and can change their actions. This is seen in the Ishvalins refugees who forgave the military and are there fighting with them at the end to overthrow King Bradley and in Winry whose forgiveness, that changes Scar and his hunt to kill all Alchemists.

Winry – Winry is a fantastic character who takes an active role in her destiny and country’s future. So many times Ed and Al try to protect her from the truth (Scar, murdering her parents) but she learns it any way and lets them know that she is here to help beyond being Ed’s mechanic. I really liked her arc over the course of the show as she develops as a mechanic and sees more beyond her village and friendship with Ed and Al, even as her relationship with Ed is sweet and I like that they end up together. She is smart and honest and though she won’t kill Scar and forgives him she says she can’t abide by him continuing to murder. This holding of account while not giving into hate changes him and it is thanks to Scar joining the fight that it is even possible to defeat Father in the end.

Atonement – Another theme in the series is that of Atonement. Mustang and his men are attempting to redeem themselves for the wrongs they committed in Ishval. Scar is attempting to redeem himself for the murders he committed and Ed and Al are also seeking atonement for their attempt to bring back their Mom, just as their Father seeks atonement for his empowering of “Father” and being a very terrible dad himself. There are other examples as well but these are some of the strongest as it is the mistakes characters made that inspire them to change things and make things better for themselves, their people or country and the people around them.

Mustang – After the horrors Roy Mustang committed in Ishval, he and his men promise to change the country and that they will make Mustang leader in the process to write these wrongs. It is powerfully done and we see Mustang facing his internal rage as well as his guilt. It is Ed and Hawkeye who show help him get past that final step to become leader when he nearly kills Envy in revenge for his killing of Hughes. In the end Mustang lives and is working to help Ishval with the hint that eventually he will become leader of Amestris.

Scar – Scar is first introduced to us as a complex antagonist. He is hunting down Alchemists on a religious crusade as he sees Alchemy as an afront to God. He is also seeking revenge for the death of his brother and the destruction of his nation by the Alchemists of Amestris. This rage and belief that drives him doesn’t change until Winry forgives him for his murder of her parents but holds him accountable for the evils he still commits. He sees her justice as worth it and the fact that she doesn’t kill him forever changes him. After this he becomes an eventual ally of our heroes and their war against “Father” and King Bradley. In the end Scar defeats Bradley and we see him unite with the refugees among his people and become a leader. What he and the Ishvalin refugees do is essential to defeating “Father.” Scar is such a wonderfully complex character and has one of the greatest arcs on the show.

The Cost of Hate and Revenge – The cost of hate and revenge are a running theme in the series that also gives it strength. Scar and Mustang are nearly defeated because of how it consumes them. Envy’s hate for humanity leads to him killing himself when they fail to give into the hate they should feel for one another. What is a part of this is that killing in murder or revenge will change you and in turn you will only hurt more in the process. Scar’s journey is truly the best execution of this path. Ed and Al and Winry and Hawkeye are the one keeping the characters balanced as they always seek alternative and also face their rage or guilt and find out why they feel the way they do. It is powerfully done and I loved this element of the show.

The Philosophy of Equal Exchange – One of the most intriguing aspects of the show is the philosophy of equal exchange. Everything has a price and is a part of something else. This is expressed anytime Alchemy is used as something can’t be created from nothing and when characters confront the mysterious “Truth.” “Truth” always takes something and in turn a character gets back something in turn.

All is One and One is All – Within Alchemy is the philosophy is all is one and one is all. This is part of Equal Exchange as something cannot be made from nothing. This philsophy is also taken literally in how the Homonculi are defeated or changed. The Homonculi are powerful one on one or against one or two people but whenever they face multiple characters or forget the people that make them up within the philosopher stones that birthed them, they lose. “Father” loses because he fails to recognize the individuals within him, and it is even the final act of one of his children Greed sacrificing himself changing him physically that leads to his final defeat. The multiple standing as one are more powerful than any single individual even if they wield the power of “God.”

Hohenhiem and “Father” – Hohenhiem grew up a slave in Xerxes, which is where “Father” who at the time was “Dwarf in the Flask Homonculus” was also a slave to the Alchemist. “Dwarf” teaches Hohenhiem and helps him become an alchemist himself. He is even the one who gives Hohenhiem his name as at this point he only has a number as an identity. and eventually gains a form when he tricks the King of Xerxes as nationwide Alchemist Circle is used to create a philosopher stone. From this Hohenhiem gains immortality and “Dwarf” becomes “Father” and takes Hohenhiem’s form.

Ed and Al – Ed and Al are the heart of the show. They are idealistic brothers who refuse to kill. They are also driven by their guilt for their attempt to bring their mother back to life through alchemy. Ed is more stubborn and loud while Al tends to be more reflective. We also see how hard is life is too. His soul is in armor as it was the only way to save him and because of this he can’t sleep or feel anything. This makes his fight through the series all the more powerful and gives strength to all his arguments to Chimera about them choosing to live and to find a cure. Ed doesn’t carry that same trauma but he is in the thick of the politics and it takes time for him to open up as his early arc is holding his trauma close. Winry is one of the first he opens up too and I love that they end up together by the end. These are two of the most compelling protagonists in any anime and it is their wonderful flaws that define them and their choices so well. They deserved getting Al’s body back and in the end they are still seeking truth as it is Ed giving up his knowledge of alchemy in order to bring him back.

The Cons:

Whiplash Between Humor and Seriousness Early on – I am not a fan of when shows jump between a more serious art-style to chibi and cutesy. “Brotherhood” has this problem early on but it happens far less as the series goes on. For that reason I’m willing to give this con more of a break since I can see why it was used as it is an attempt to give humor to all the tragedy that happens over the course of the show.

The fact that the only real con is the very common anime animation and humor whiplash is a testament to just how strong this show is. I came to care about nearly all the protagonists but they minor or major characters. There was nuance in how they were written and their relationships. We also had a show that explored philosophy and identity deeply. We got all of this told through a beautiful animation and soundtrack. It has been a while since I’ve reviewed or watched anime and it was very worth it return back to this stunning story. I highly recommend it to anyone looking for a fantastic and deep story.

Final Score: 10 / 10 The show does have flaws, but the strengths of it far outweigh those flaws. This is an example of how to tell a great long form story with consequences that can explore deeper themes.

 

Star Trek: The Next Generation – Season 3, Episode 16 – “The Offspring” – Data’s Daughter and the Rights of Androids

The Offspring"... 26 Years Later

   “The Offspring” is the sequel to “The Measure of a Man” as we see Data create a child. The story that is explored from this premise is great and I can see this story living on in “Star Trek: Picard.” I won’t say more than that as I recommend the show and think you should see it for yourself if you are a fan of Data’s story. This was Jonathan Frake’s first time directing and he does a wonderful job of capturing the the fears and joys of being a new parent. Without going into spoilers, I recommend this story to anyone who loves “The Next Generation.”

The episode was directed by Jonathan Frakes and written by René Echevarria.

The story follows Data after he crafts a child he names Lal. From here her future is thrown into flux as Starfleet wants to take her away and study her at the Daystrom Institute.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

Data Learns Parenting – The process of Data learning to parent is quite wonderful. He talks to Dr. Crusher about raising Wesley and also to Guinan as his daughter grows up. We see him introduce her to the different aspects of what it means to be human…from smelling a flower and is proud when she asks the big questions about purpose and existence. Brent Spiner does a fantastic job in this role and is his daughter’s defender against Starfleet when they try to take her away.

Picard and Android Rights – Picard is Data’s defender through this entire episode, even though he wished he’d been consulted about Data creating Lal. We can see how the events in “The Measure of a Man” have shaped his philosophy and he brings up that case with Starfleet. It is beautiful to see and I’d say this Picard

Admiral Haftel – The Admiral is a character in the same vein as Maddox. He’s driven to protect Starfleet interests and comes to sympathize with the very people he is making it difficult for. His final acts are working with Data to save Lal…I just wish he’d admit he caused her panic attack and is the reason she died. Great complicated antagonist to say the least. He brings up his own experience as a father and having to let go as his kids grew up. He respects Data even as he is driven by duty.

Lal – Lal is Data’s daughter and this episode we see how that process takes place. She chooses to take on the form of a human woman and over the course of the episode we see her go from basic experiences, questioning her own existence and experiencing emotion. Hallie Todd is fantastic in the role and I love how you can see aspects of Data in her as it was him as he transferred his brain into the one he crafted for her. Her last emotion is sorrow and love of her father Data as she experiences sadness for both of them. It was touching and powerful. This episode has a powerful core and Data and Lal are the heart of it.

Data – Data is an awesome Dad. In this we see him stand up against Starfleet and the rights of himself and Lal and guide Lal through the process he’s been going through for years. It is beautifully done and heartbreaking when she dies as she takes her program into his memory and she mourns for both of them as Data at this time…cannot mourn. He drives this episode from the beginning and his and Lal’s relationship is what truly makes the episode great.

The Cons:

Starfleet Ignoring Prior Cases – The Admiral follows the evil Admiral trope that we often see in “Star Trek.” He ignores everything that Data, Lal or Picard say and that was really a disservice as he is an interesting character. Sadly it is his giving Lal a panic attack that leads to her death. If the Admiral was not here chances are she would have survived. This is never directly addressed, which I feel like was a mistake. She was fine until her choice was taken away by the Admiral and she panicked.

This is a great sequel to “The Measure of a Man” as it further develops both Data and Picard and shows that Starfleet is still adversarial to Androids and them existing as beings with their own autonomy and rights. Lal is a fantastic character and I would have enjoyed this story being a two-parter, just to see more of her journey of growing up and becoming more human. Sadly this was not the case. Still, this is a great episode and well worth your time.

Final Score: 9 / 10 If Haftel and Lal had both received more development I’d rate it higher. Episode is still great, just needed that final bit of character development.

“Castlevania” Season 3 – An Exploration of Hope Lost

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  Season 3 of “Castlevania” is really good filler. There are a lot of pieces moving and characters are developed, but there isn’t the core driving action that was last season. I still highly recommend checking it out though if you are a fan of the show. There are 10 episodes this season and none of them are wasted. Warren Ellis has truly crafted an amazing story and I’m curious to see where the story goes next.

This season was directed by Sam and Adam Deats and written by Warren Ellis.

The story follows Sypha and Trevor uncovering the mystery behind a town, two twins befriending Alucard in his isolation, Carmilla’s plotting of conquest and Isaac as he creates an army in his quest to get revenge against those who betrayed Dracula.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

Saint Germain – Saint Germain is a fantastic character. He is Lindenfeld seeking a portal in order to get back to his wife. He find allies in Sypha and Trevor and it is wonderful seeing them interact as he sees himself as above everyone but them. In a depressing season he is such a fun character who brings levity and humor to all that happens this season. He also helps save the day by closing the Portal to Hell when the Priory in Lindenfeld is trying to summon Dracula back from Hell.

The Sisters – Carmilla and her 3 sisters make up a Vampire coven in Styria who is planning conquest. In order to conquer they need troops though and this involves her sister Lenore seducing and tricking Hector into being their slave. I thought it was handled well as she showed a soft power approach and diplomacy compared to how blunt most of her other sisters are. Striga is the warrior who loves battle, Morana is the strategist and Carmilla is the spark and planner. They have a fascinating dynamic and I can’t wait to see Isaac, Sypha and Trevor take them on.

Sypha and Trevor – Sypha and Trevor are such a cute couple. In this we get to see how much they enjoy killing monsters and protecting people. Sypha especially revels in combat. They play off each other really well and it is the first time we really see a more happy Trevor…until the end. At the end they discover the Judge of the town they couldn’t save was a serial killer the entire time. Once happy fighting evil they discover the evil in humanity again and they have each other, but that is it. By the end of this season, they feel alone. They really should go back to Alucard.

Isaac – Isaac has a fascinating arc this season. He is driven by Dracula’s goal to exterminate humanity, though he still is willing to give people a chance. We see him spare those who show kindness and his conversations with a merchant, a captain and another Forgemaster make him realize that he should shape his own destiny. It is powerfully done and I can’t wait for him to take on Carmilla and her sisters.

Alucard – Alucard is alone and going mad until two hunters, Sumi and Taka seek him for training. He believes them at first until they try to kill him. This loneliness and betrayal breaks him and he puts their corpses outside the Dracula’s Castle as a warning, beginning to embrace the practices of his father, who also had lost all hope humans. He really needs Sypha and Trevor to bring him back to balance.

Hopeless Humanity – Isaac is attacked by multiple groups who are destroyed, Sypha and Trevor discover the evil in the town they couldn’t save and Sumi and Taka show that even those who appear good can do evil. This was the theme this season and is meant to explore why Dracula was the way he was. It is really well done and a proper way for filler to be handled.

The Cons:

The Twins – Sumi and Taka were slaves of Cho’s court. Cho was one of Dracula’s generals from Japan and we see how in control she was over the populace, even letting hunters in for fun. From this I can see why they don’t trust vampires but Alucard killed Dracula. Them trying to kill Alucard wasn’t fleshed out enough, they needed more development for the turn the story took.

Feels Like Filler – In the end what does bring it down is that it does feel like filler. It is good filler, but knowing a show could be canceled at anytime I tend to see filler as a waste. This was a good use of filler but the problem of it still happens. This was really good but if the show ended here it wouldn’t be a good end to “Castlevania.”

I really enjoyed this season. It is depressing as hell but the character development is well handled. I also love how big this world is. This season was largely setup for the big events that will no doubt play out and I think it handled it well. The only con was really the twins as I get why they existed (to make Alucard more like his father and lose hope in humanity) but their motivations needed much more development. I hope Alucard catches a break soon, he’s one of my favorite characters on the show and it sucks seeing him go through all this. Can’t wait to see how the upcoming wars go.

Final Score: 8.6 / 10 Boosted slightly by the good character work.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine – Season 1, Episode 4 – “A Man Alone” – The Isolation of the Station

       “A Man Alone” is a fun episode. It isn’t good, but it is enjoyable. This is the 4th episode of season 1 and you can tell the writers are still finding their footing. The story is following a core mystery plot that needs more development of the villain and a B plot that gives the episode more life, but doesn’t quite make it good. Early “Deep Space Nine” was still defining itself and this episode is a good example of it. It does still make for an enjoyable outing though.

The screenplay was written by Michael Piller who co-wrote the story with Gerald Sanford and directed by Paul Lynch.

The story involves an old enemy who of Odo’s who turns up on the station who winds up dead behind a locked door, with Odo as the prime suspect. The secondary plot follows Keiko as she finds purpose on the station.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros:

Commander Sisko – This episode is a good Sisko episode. It is in this episode we see him negotiate Bajoran hatred of Odo when Odo is blamed for a murder he didn’t commit. It is Sisko taking control of the situation that stops Odo from getting killed or injured when a mob of Bajorans has fallen attacked Odo’s office. Sisko is my favorite Captain, though at this point in his story he still a commander as he doesn’t have The Defiant yet.

Miles and Keiko – The B plot follows Keiko and her finding purpose on the station. I’m including Miles here because he is very much the supportive spouse. He comes up with a few ideas to help with the isolation and you can see just how much he loves her. Miles knows she chose to come here but it also meant giving up opportunities. Keiko also clearly can find her own way. We see her watch the fallout of Nog and Jake harassing civilians and realizes that the children on the station are just as isolated as she is. This inspires her to make a school. Keiko is truly an underrated character and this episode is a good example of why she is so good.

Jazdia Dax – This is a good Jazdia episode. We see her turn down the multiple advances from Dr. Bashir when he is being a creep and also learn more about the Trill. At this point in her life as Trill she’s lived many lives and is trying to get away from attachments. This changes later on the series, but right now she is trying to be the greatest being she can be. She has so much patience dealing with Dr. Bashir. We also see her friendship with Commander Sisko develop as she clearly isn’t his mentor Kurzon but that they can still relate and talk even with Jazdia’s aspirations to be the best of the Trill.

Isolation – A major theme of the story is how isolating it is for many of the characters on “Deep Space Nine.” Whether it is Keiko feeling like she has no purpose or Odo being othered by the Bajorans, countless people feel alone. It is out of this loneliness and isolation that friendships can arise though, as we see with Nog and Jake’s friendship in the episode. We also see how the idea for the school was born out of Keiko’s own isolation.

“The Other” – “The Other” is a major theme of the episode. This is Odo’s character and he illustrates it in a few ways. From him calling out he doesn’t trust Commander Sisko because they don’t know each other and also that because he served as security during the Occupation of Bajor and isn’t a Bajoran that Bajor will always see him as different. He is a changeling and isn’t a solid. This is a major defining part of what defines Odo and this episode shows why this is. He is the unknown and the fearful, stupid masses are easily turned against him when he is framed.

Okay:

Ibudan – Ibudan is the antagonist of the episode and he isn’t great. I’m not putting him as a con because the idea of killing your clone to frame someone is a brilliant idea. We never see him talk to Odo though. For a villain he isn’t given much to do in regards to interacting with the cast. This doesn’t hurt his presentation but it makes it incredibly average and forgettable.

The Cons:

Julian Bashir – Alexander Siddig is one of my favorite actors. This is a situation where I blame the writers. Julian Bashir comes off as a creep in this episode. Jazdia turns him down multiple times and he keeps trying. Bashir becomes an amazing character later, but early on he does not make himself endearing in any way. He’s over eager and a creep and he’s the head Doctor on the station.

“A Man Alone” is a solidly enjoyable mystery and exploration of the station. The strongest writing involve any time isolation is explored and the B Plot with Keiko and her formation of the school is good example of why. Where it falls flat is in Bashir’s inability to take a hint or to respect Trill culture (Jazdia tells him she’s not interested in romance) and Ibudan as a villain is only okay. He really needed more development and we should have seen him interact with Odo before the murder to put more suspicion onto Odo. For these reasons I can’t really say the episode was good. I’d still recommend it to any fan of the show though. There are some good things that happen in the episode, even if the overall quality never gets beyond enjoyable.

Final Score: 7 / 10. This was a solidly enjoyable episode.

 

Top 5 Characters in “Gotham”

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       With “Gotham” now at an end, I was thinking at how I best wanted to explore my thoughts on the series. First, I think it is a solid show well worth your time if you are a Batman fan, though it’s flaws kept it from being great. One thing that kept it good, even with the flaws was how memorable so many of the characters were. I’m a huge fan of Batman and his rogues gallery and this series brought some amazing interpretations of his allies and rogues to the screen. “Gotham” is a show that tells the story of Commissioner Gordon and Bruce Wayne before Bruce Wayne becomes Batman. It is here we see one version of how his enemies came to be and what motivates Gordon and defines the city of Gotham. The series was created by Bruno Heller, and the fact that this list exists shows that at the end of the day, I did like this show.

The show wasn’t always the best, there were a few times I took a break during it’s run and to me the final was serviceable but nothing I’d praise. It just established what the show had been leading up to the entire time and didn’t do it in a unique way. I’m avoiding details for those who haven’t watched the finale yet. I want to avoid Final Season spoilers as this show makes it easy to talk about the broad strokes of what worked or didn’t.

For the weak characters, I wasn’t the biggest fan of Bruce and Selina for a long time. They eventually became okay. Ra’s al Ghul was wasted and given he is played by one of my favorite actors (Alexander Siddig) I held that against the show. The Al Ghul’s in general were wasted as was the League of Shadows. They were supposed to be this apocalyptic force but they never did much to the heroes of the story in big picture scheme of the show. For the few who did do something they almost always end up dead or useless by the end of their arcs. The gangsters like Carmine and Sofia Falcone stayed compelling during their runs but they also didn’t have the unique feel of the characters I’m going to give an honorary mentions too. Same goes for Theo / Azrael and his sister Tabitha / Tigress. They were interesting but weren’t fascinating enough for an honorary mention.

For my honorary mentions. Those go to Barbara and Jim Gordon, Harvey Bullock and Lee Thompkins to start. These were are complicated characters who often times fell on the side of the good. Also honorary mentions to Scarecrow and the Mad Hatter for being fascinating villains whose twisted mentality added to the show. None of these folks made the list but were a joy to watch and what kept the show interesting when my favorite characters weren’t getting exciting moments. Fish Mooney was also great and I enjoyed what they did with her over her run on the show. Zsasz also deserves a mention too. Whether he was working for a crime boss or on his own, he always had fun and was threatening in any situation they put him in.

How without further ado, here are my Top 5 Characters on “Gotham.”:

 

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5th Place – Alfred Pennyworth

Alfred is a character I wish we had gotten more time to know. I’m not the only one apparently since he is getting his own show in Fox called “Pennyworth.” This goes to show just how powerful Sean Pertwee’s performance was. Pertwee gave a hardness and empathy that I have rarely seen in how Alfred is written or potrayed on film. This was a man who was taking care of Bruce and fighting rogues throughout the entire season. Sometimes it would break him physically or emotionally, but he always came back. He had the compassion that Jim sometimes lost and he’d been through so much more with his time in the Special Forces of Great Britain. He also wasn’t a doormat for Bruce, when Bruce was a selfish teenager, he left. He left Bruce sort out himself but was always there to help, when Bruce was ready. The little scenes we get related to that past crystallize this Alfred as a wonderfully compelling badass. This Alfred understood the choice when Bruce was going vigilante, and even though he questioned he still supported him in the end. Some of the best scenes in this entire show came from Pertwee and I’m curious what “Pennyworth” is going to bring to the Lore of this show and the compelling character of Alfred Pennyworth.

 

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4th Place – Jerome and Jeremiah Valeska / The Jokers

“Gotham” took an approach to “The Joker” I haven’t seen before. For the character two brothers played by the same actor inhabited the role. We got Jerome Valeska’s origin in Season 1 with Jim Gordon and he was one of the main antagonists until he made his brother Jerome crazy later. Each them inhabits parts of the Joker lore. Jerome is more “New 52” (who had his face taken off and sewed back on) and is insanity who acted more on instinct and big events while his brother Jeremiah was more of the thinker. His brother Jeremiah thought big and is the one who we end up following until the end. This Joke has a a friendship with Bruce before Jerome drives him crazy and this gives depth to the craziness that comes later. As you can see I could not choose between the two and as they are both played by Cameron Monaghan. I feel that they deserve the tie. Each brings a different part of the lore to this character that is so essential to Batman’s lore. I also thought that the writer’s could have gone deeper, which is why neither of them are further up on the list. Cameron’s acting is great but at times they didn’t know what to do with this character and he rarely had season running arcs.

 

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3rd Place – Edward Nygma / The Riddler

Edward Nygma was a character I hated initially. He was all the aspects of the toxic creep and was presented as potentially redeemable for the longest time. It took him going full “Riddler” that really changed my perspective on him. It was in his role as the manipulator who wanted to make a name from it that made him compelling. “The Riddler” and Nygma contrast and them agreeing on being bad and devoting themselves to it is what made him a great villain. He had to go through Arkham to get there but when he came out it was his relationship with Penguin that added complexity, especially as his old toxic evil habits came back again. Cory Michael Smith brought so much nuance to this role and dual personalities that exist between Nygma and “The Riddler.” Even given this dichotomy though, he is always the villain and never does anything that doesn’t logically serve his own ends, but he will put his neck out for others and take risks for that core goal. We see this with Lee Thompkins and even Penguin a few brief times. His frenemy relationship with Penguin was one of my favorite things and whenever they found a working relationship, things were gold as “The Riddler” was the strategist while Penguin was willing to ruthlessly fight and kill for anything he desired. They were a dangerous duo and it was out of that relationship that “The Riddler” became one of my favorite characters.

 

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2nd Place – Doctor Hugo Strange

B.D. Wong’s version of Doctor Hugo Strange is the best version of this character I have seen thus far. The first time I appreciated Hugo Strange as a character was Gotham City as he was a manipulator pulling on the strings and winning through most of the story. He manages to trap Bruce Wayne in Arkham City in the game, which is a huge feat in and of itself. It was making him a minion in that story, which was the problem. Here is is often times serving people, but he always has a larger agenda at play or at least some level of survival to be himself beyond another’s aims. Throughout the entire series Strange was always one step ahead of foes and I can’t think of a time where he truly lost. Whomever was around would never kill him because he was far to useful and he’d use that to eventually outdo them or escape. This is the character who out of the 5 here has the least connection to Bruce Wayne, which makes me curious about what his relationship will be later to Batman, later in the lore post “Gotham.” “Regardless, “Gotham” is worth watching if only for the Doctor Hugo Strange episodes and B.D. Wong’s masterful performance. He brings in the insane mad scientist who has a familial bond with his creations and resurrections, as well as a ruthlessness of someone who in the end is doing everything to some greater unknown end.

 

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1st Place – Oswald Cobblepot / The Penguin

Robin Lord Taylor truly created the best version of “The Penguin” I have seen in any of the DC Lore. This is a Penguin who has been Mayor, been through Arkham, Blackgate and risen and fallen multiple times. Even with the rise and fall of this character, with those rises and falls over seasons came to define the best of “Gotham” for me. In this show we get to learn about Penguin’s father born of money who he ended up re-establishing a relationship with, only for his step-family to kill his father and further drive him to madness. This combined with betrayals throughout his many rises lead to Penguin becoming paranoid. This paranoia became one his defining traits along with his selfish petulant nature. How did this end up being appealing? Because those aspects of the character are always there but oftentimes he would choose courage or take a risk with an enemy and make them an ally. He does this with Ed after Ed tries to kill him and easily found compromises with the Mob and gangs when he wasn’t taking them over. For how obvious Cobblepot’s flaws are he knew how to use them. This is why he is my favorite character. Along with him being smart enough to know his foes, Robin Lord Taylor granted this character limited moments of empathy and sorrow that gave depth to the character that I have not seen in any show or movie for Penguin, nor read in any comic. This is why he is 1st Place on my Top 5 Character of “Gotham.”

For any fan of DC Comics this is a show worth checking out. I’d put it far above “Batman Forever” and “Batman and Robin.” There are better properties like Burton and Nolan, but this is an example of good adaptation. This series is better than “The New 52” animated Batman films that I reviewed years ago aren’t nearly as good at making their heroes as compelling or deep and their rogues are forgettable. This series is in no way perfect. Characters are brought back to life, plot lines are abandoned and sometimes there are arcs that only exist for the sake of love triangle dramas. Some of these choices worked and some didn’t, but at the end of the day I stuck around for the characters. These are the five characters who made the show worth watching in the end, and the reason I’d recommend this show to any Batman fan.

The Neighbors – Season 1, Episode 1 – “Meet The Neighbors” – An Atrocity of Television

The Neighbors by Wiseau

      This is awful…and I’ve seen some pretty awful films but this makes Michael Bay and others look like gold by comparison. I have no idea what Tommy Wiseau was thinking once he made this series, or how he was able to get funding for it and the fact that Hulu endorsed it. “The Room” must have really put him on the map for this atrocity of television to be created. I’ll get into the details of just how bad this show is later on, but it’s all on Tommy Wiseau.

   “Meet the Neighbors” was directed, written and produced by Tommy Wiseau.

     The story is an introduction of all the crazy people living in an apartment place and all the drama and relationships that ensue in a day in the life. I’m not going to bother listing any okays or pros because there are none. Everything after this paragraph is one of the many problems with this show and episode.

Sound Editing – Every little pop is heard and sometimes characters are talking and it just goes silent. Did Wiseau look over this at all? This feels like it was just crapped out and whatever happened he’d just keep there no matter how awful it sounded. This applies to the weird techno that is entered in throughout the episode.

Editing – The editing is terrible, certain scenes go on way too long after they have ended. The cutaways are random and don’t always work, and the electronic 80’s beat in between gets grating really fast. It’s like fingers on a chalk board.

Cinematography – The cinematography is crap. This show looks like it was filmed with a home video and if it was a website it would be geocities. Everything is jumbled and cramped and sometimes the camera isn’t even on the person talking or doesn’t show a person fully. I kind of wonder if the folks who filmed it were drunk….though that might be way too generous.

Writing – There are some really awkwardly worded sentences that make no sense and the character dialogue is just bad. From a woman who screams and wants her chicken, to a guy borrowing 20 dollars and it’s supposed to be a joke I think, the characters he plays are all awkward and what chemistry he’s supposed to have with the tenants doesn’t exist at all, same with his bro in a sports jacket. It’s clearly just Wiseau playing dress up. The writing feels what would come out of a bad porn.

The Characters – All the women are bikinis and just exist to flirt with the guys, all the guys exist to cause conflict by either asking for money, making out with the women or fighting with one another and being racist. It’s just bad television and Wiseau’s characters just kind of exist (he plays two) and even though one is the owner of the apartment he has no motivation at all, just like the rest of the cast. The show almost feels improvised but by people who have never done improve before. It was as if random people were just grabbed off the street by Wiseau and maybe put into costumes and after told they should just fight and flirt with another and that they’d be in his, “Hit new American show.” There is no humor, characters have no depth and relationships are all base level of just wanting to sleep with each other or fight.

  Seriously who approved this crap? After I watched it my brain felt like it had melted a little. Everything about this show sucks and not in the “So bad it is good way.” How did Wiseau get Hulu to air this? Who backed this? Was it made from his money from “The Room.” It really is a confusing mess whose existence should not be. If you want a glimpse into the mind of Wiseau, I guess you should check it out…but do so at your own risk.

0 / 10

Rick and Morty – Season 1, Episode 8 – “Rixty Minutes” – Summer and Morty and the Improv Show

Rixty_Minutes

      “Rixty Minutes” is mostly an improv clip show with some great character moments inbetween. It feels very improvised, including the end which Morty actually references inside the episode! This is brilliant but the format brings it down as well as the fact that not all the comedy acts are good.

       The story involves Rick installing a dimensional device onto the television that allows them to watch shows from other realities which leads to Jerry and Beth seeing the life they might have had without Summer and Summer dealing with being the outsider and viewed as a mistake.

The Pros: Some of the Skits – The Skits are super random, you have a “Ants in his eyes,” a guy a play of the “A-Team” and a few other shows too as well as Jerry appearing as an actor in some films. They mostly work and are funny.

Summer and Morty – Summer feels unloved after she learns she might have been aborted and that her mom had thought about it leading to her ready to run away until Morty shows her the graves in the backyard and tells her about he and Rick destroyed the other reality. It’s a powerful scene and the first time Morty opens up.

Rick – Rick references prior episodes and is detached watching tv the entire time. His complete non-chalateness is wonderful and he’s the only sane person as the egos around him go crazy. Morty is also sane too.

Okay: Jerry and Beth – These two just weren’t that funny. There were popular and successful in their alternate realities but completely alone and in the end they come together in that alternate reality too. It felt like a play on romantic comedies, and I liked the moment of them in the alternate reality getting together, but beyond that it was the weakest part of the episode.

This was a good episode brought down mostly by the format. You can only do some much with randomness. It was funny, which made it good and there were some good character moments, but it was mostly skits, giving it an almost “Family Guy” like feel.

Final Score: 8 / 10