“The Librarians” Season 2 – Characters Grow and the Art of Ego and Story

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    “The Librarians” Season 2 works in so many ways, especially as it relates to the main overarching narrative as the face off against Propsero. Where it falls apart sometimes, is when we get our single character driven episodes, but even with that there are exceptions as it is within those episodes that there was one of my favorite guest stars and one of my favorite episodes on this entire show, so there are exceptions of which I’ll get into deeper in the review.

  This is the only show I’ll watch on TNT and John Rodgers really did a fantastic job creating a show that takes the best of “Doctor Who” and “Indiana Jones” and does something completely new, this season continues that.

     The main arc of this season is the Librarians taking on the threat of Prospero who reintroduces magic into the world and wants to bring the world back to a time before humans. It is up the Librarians to discover how to stop him and his agents he brings from other stories, such as Professor Moriarty.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros: The World – The world of “The Librarians” has always been a lot of fun and in this season we get more mythic beasts, more with magic and also science and tech. mixed together like what we got in one of the alternate without Flynn futures. Suffice to say I can’t wait to return to this world in Season 3.

The Premise – The idea of a fantasy character coming to life because of belief in it is super neat and this show takes that premise and runs with it as we meet other characters like Prospero and he summons other people to help him bring about a world where magic reigns supreme.

The Characters – The characters have always been the strongest part of the show and this season is no exception as each of our heroes are given the chance to get explored and we get some pretty fantastic minor characters too.

Mephistopheles – John De Lancie guest stars as “The Devil” Mephistopheles and he is amazing! It is very much a Q type role, which a role De Lancie excels in and it is fun to see him win for most of the episode until his entire premise of granting wishes is turned on him.

Prospero – Prospero is a good baddie. We learn that he arose from Shakespeare afraid of having nothing to live for anymore and he is Shakespeare embracing ego and fear to become Prospero. In this way it is fun to see him come back as they use to words and symbols of Shakespeare in order to defeat him and turn him back into a man.

Moriarty – Moriarty is wonderful and complex. He is the betrayer and clever, but at the end of the day stands with the Librarians. He also has a crush on Eve which is all kinds of adorable as he cares about our heroes even though he cares more about himself and fears Prospero more for most of the show. David S. Lee does a fantastic job and I enjoy how Flynn became his Sherlock. He’s the most sympathetic Moriarty outside of “Elementary.”

Jenkins – Jenkins is in a much smaller role this season when he isn’t figuring out how to stop Prospero. He’s still great and important but the part that stood out the most to me was his conflict with Cassandra when the Ladies of the Lake come to her. He rightfully has a lot of fear wrapped up in anything involving magic.

Stone – Stone has to deal with his father who is an Oil Baron and come to terms with the fact that he won’t ever really have peace with him. It is cool when he admits all the great things he’s done though and at least come to neutral with his Dad. His Dad’s ire is part of what inspires him to be great as he is a reaction to him, which feeds to “Monster of the Week.”

Ezekiel – Ezekiel’s good comes out this season as we see him risk his life countless times in the videogame episode and show that he does care even though he pretends not too. This season he really comes through and shows just why he is a “Librarian.”

Cassandra – Cassandra is tied to the magic and risks everything to stop Hell on Earth at one point. For this she meets the Ladies of the Lake and we see that she tied to magic and can join them if she so wishes. This leads to her clashing with Jenkins and I suspect conflict down the line as magic is shown to be corruption or at least disconnecting from humanity.

Flynn – Flynn like Jenkins is more on the side this season when he isn’t dealing with Prospero and the main plot. We see how clever he is though and how fun he is as well as tricks Prospero, making Prospero believe he destroyed the Tree of Knowledge and his conflict with Moriarty is great too as they both care about Eve.

Eve – Eve has some good stuff this season, when she is leading she is at her strongest and she does get an episode where she has to save a friend who made a deal with the devil. In that she shows how clever she is as she wishes for the devil to be mortal. She really is an amazing character and is the heart of the show as she is always helping those around her grow and growing herself.

 “And the Point of Salvation” – This was the best episode this season as it involves the team being trapped in a Quantam Computer that is a videogame and it is only though Ezekiel’s sacrifice and actions that they are freed from the game. Has the most heart felt moment in the show when he tells them about how often he has watched them die.

The Power of Story – The power of story is a theme of the season as the Librarians fight fictional characters and said characters try to create their own stories and narrative. Within the bounds of their characters and story so much is done and the power that comes with that comes full circle when Shakespeare is saved.

Letting Go – Stone has to let go of his dad’s thoughts about him, Shakespeare has to let go of fame, Cassandra and Ezekiel make the ultimate sacrifice and all of them have to let go of their dreams to come back to reality and escape Prospero’s trap. This is the overall theme of this season and it is done beautifully.

Okay: Tone – The tone facing the “Doctor Who” problem where sometimes it is a bit cartoony and slap stick and this is happening at the same time as serious events of mortality and morality. I didn’t mind it but I did notice it this season.

The Cons: “And the Image of Image” – This was a bad episode, I enjoy the book, “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” but here Gray is forgettable and his relationship with Jenkins never felt real. This episode also had our characters getting drunk which usually always involves hack writing in any show.

    This was a great season, how it compares to last season, I’m not quite sure…but I enjoyed it all the way through and it made me look forward to how relationships will further develop in Season 3. I loved the theme of letting go and story this season as they are themes I enjoy in my own writing and the Ezekiel episode is one of my favorite television episodes of any show at this point. If you got past Season 1 and loved it, chances are you will love Season 2.

Final Score: 9 / 10

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“The Librarians” Season 1 – An Amazing Show That Takes the Best Aspects of “Indiana Jones” and “Doctor Who”

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   “The Librarians” is such a great series. Never have I watched a series that captures the fun, adventure and hope of humanity so well since “Doctor Who,” and not only that it does it with the fun and camp adventure of “Indiana Jones.” Suffice to say, for my non-spoiler thoughts…Season 1 is worth checking out if you are a fan of any of the media I mentioned above. The show was born out of two made for tv movies on TNT, both of which I’ll be checking out later.

    The series was created by John Rodgers and airs on TNT.

    The story involves the Librarian Flynn (Noah Flynn) being forced to have another Guardian in the Special Forces NATO soldier Colonel Eve Baird (Rebecca Romijn) and taking on apprentices when the Library chooses them knowing challenges are coming to it’s existence.

SPOILERS ahead

The Pros: The World – The world is fantastic! There are magical beings, monsters, treaties, spells, alternate dimensions and characters out of stories as well as the fascinating characters who inhabit these worlds.

The Soundtrack – The soundtrack has a hopeful epic quality to it, much like “Doctor Who” with elements of “Indiana Jones” thrown in for good measure. Joseph LoDuca did a great job composing the score.

The Mythology – The mythology is fantastic as we have characters out of Aurthurian Legend shape the world around them. From Morgan La Fey and her trying to escape from our world, from Galahad working with the Library and Lancelot trying to bring back Camelot at it’s height. It is a rich mythology that is the core of the show including the timelessness of “The Library” and the different myths and legends that the Librarians explore.

Adventure – The sense of adventure is one of the strongest parts of this show. It kicks off this way with the pilot and stays true throughout as we travel through time, adventures, ancient temples and magical realms. It is absolutely a fun ride.

The Characters – The characters are the strongest part of the show, each of them has great motivations behind what they do and are not as simple as they first appear to be. These are the ones who carry the show.

Lamia – Lamia is Dulaque’s second-in-command and is a great threat as she takes control of Excalibur and King Arthur’s Crown and uses it to bring magic into the world. Sadly Dulaque kills her in the end to bring back his height of power but we do see her as Cassandra’s second-in-command in an alternate future where Dragons have destroyed everything.

Santa Claus – Bruce Campbell plays Santa and he’s a lot of fun. He manages to capture all the variations of the archetype through time, from St. Nick, to Santa and all the way back to Thor. I kind of hope we see him again, Campbell clearly had fun with the role.

Morgan La Fey –  Alicia Witt does an amazing job at creating a powerful and sympathetic Morgan La Fey. From her history with Jenkins, to Eve being the only one to hurt her in centuries and her desiring escape rather than power. This is a character with dimension who I can’t wait to see again.

Jenkins / Galahad – John Larroquette is great in the mentor role as Galahad/Jenkins the overseer of the Library who help the Librarians train up and to grow. His arc is choosing to fight again after he’s retreated into his work because of how much life/Morgan La Fey/Lancelot have hurt him. It takes his relationship to Eve and the Librarians to find himself again and become the hero of old once more.

Dulaque / Lancelot – Dulaque is a great threat, and I wish we had had more time with him. We see him attempt to overthrow the Library in the Conclave of the magical organizations. He is both a strong threat magically as well as physically. We also see a man who is desperate for the good old days of old, which gives him dimension as every conversation with Galahad reveals that it was his idealism that lead to his fall. Like in the book, Lancelot is a tragic figure.

Jacob – Jacob is a Texan the Library calls who has a love of art and culture and huge tie to family obligation. His arc is finding adventure and learning to see a world outside of his family as well as trust his team. Christian Kane really does a good job. He becomes The Librarian in a post-apocalyptic war reality.

Ezekiel – Ezekiel is a thief and this comes in handy on multiple occasions as he is already his worst self so his arc is finding his nobility and best self. We see this happen over time as he helps Cassandra get past her guilt and is a key player in most of the stories. The character annoyed me at first but he is now a favorite. His arc is fantastic and I liked his sci. fi. Librarian in the reality where ghosts had taken over. John Kim did an amazing job in the role.

Cassandra – Cassandra is one of the new librarians who has a tumor in her brain that helps her visualize thoughts and patterns. She is a great character who starts out betraying the Librarians an the Library but fights for them in the end and spends her arc earning back their trust and making peace with her death that will eventually come. Her story is powerful and Lindy Booth lends the role so much power. In the dimension where she is The Librarian she is a powerful magician who was trained by Morgan La Fey and uses her magic to pull all the other Librarians from their dimension bringing the team together for the final fight against Dulaque.

Colonel Eve Baird – Eve is a skeptic who becomes a believer in magic over the course of the show and has to learn how to be a leader but not necessarily a soldier, as none of the Librarians have any military training. It is when she thinks outside the box as Guardian that we see her really flourish. It is thanks to her that the Universe is saved and the Loom of Fate restored to normal as she helps Flynn find his power once as the Librarian and empowers as the other Librarians in the realities where they are the only Librarian. Rebecca Romijn is a great actress.

Flynn – Noah Wyle could play an american Doctor in “Doctor Who,” his role as the Librarian who kicks everything off is imbued with the love of adventure, arrogance and courage in the face of world ending threats. He was the character who got me hooked on the show and it is thanks to him I came to care about the other Librarians. I can’t wait to see what happens in Season 2 as we see how his arc of becoming a mentor and team player pays off in the long term of this series.

Okay / Cons: Too Pulp At Times – There are some episodes where the camp dialogue almost makes the show too campy. What counters this and why I’m not putting it as a complete con is that the characters are compelling enough to get around some of the hokey dialogue and threats.

The Cons: Will Death Happen? – Eve is brought back to life when Flynn brings back the Library. My fear with this is that we will get into “Doctor Who” territory where no one dies so the villains never end up feeling like a threat. They felt like a threat this season so maybe this won’t be an issue, but Eve’s resurrection at the end was an issue for me as related to future stories.

  This is overwhelmingly a solid show and even though I have fears that death won’t mean anything (which is the same problem I have with “Doctor Who” and some writing choices Moffat pulled). The characters overwhelmingly carry the show through the moments of really camp writing and I love all of the Librarians. Each of them is compelling and gets developed into a fully 3 Dimensional character. I can’t wait to watch Season 2 and learn some more of Flynn’s backstory in the TNT films. Suffice to say, I highly recommend this first season of this series.

Final Score: 9.6 / 10